If You're Listening: YA Read-Alouds Online

Read-alouds are usually the domain of picture books, but teens also enjoy being read to, and audiobooks are popular among all ages. Here are some read-aloud videos of YA titles—classic, new, and upcoming books—from publishers, authors, and librarians.

Read-alouds are usually the domain of picture books, but teens also enjoy being read to, and audiobooks are popular among all ages. While summer reading looks different this year and many young people gear up for virtual school, here are some read-aloud videos of YA titles—classic, new, and upcoming books—from publishers, authors, and librarians.

 

Publishers

Scholastic’s I Read YA YouTube channel features Friday Reads, in which authors read from their published and upcoming titles, including Nic Stone, Bill Konigsberg, and Leah Johnson.

HarperCollins’s Epic Reads has a large number of audiobook excerpts from new and backlist titles. Standouts include Punching the Air, The Black Flamingo, The Poet XThe Hate U Give, Dumplin’, and Thirteen Doorways, Wolves Behind Them All. They also have middle grade audiobook excerpts on their Shelf Stuff channel.

Little, Brown Young Readers’ channel includes videos of Jen Calonita reading from Family Affairs, Book 3 in the “Secrets of My Hollywood Life” series, and Cornelia Funke reading the first chapter of Reckless—complete with a comfy chair and roaring fire.

On Penguin Teen’s YouTube channel, Laurie Halse Anderson reads the poem “#MeToo” from SHOUT and Moïra Fowley-Doyle introduces and reads from The Accident Season.

Faber & Faber, which published Jason Reynolds’ Long Way Down in the UK, includes an audiobook excerpt—read by the author—here.

[Read: 8 YA BookTubers To Watch Right Now]

Authors

During school closures the spring, Kenneth Oppel posted 20 videos of him reading from his YA, middle grade, early reader, and picture books, including Every Hidden Thing, This Dark Endeavor, and Nest.

In April, Lauren McLauglin posted two videos of her reading chapters from her novel Send Pics.

And in March, Matt Mikalatos began a rare thing—reading the entirety of his book The Crescent Stone, live, one chapter per day. He finished in June, and you can find all of the videos on his YouTube channel.

 

Librarians and educators

A teacher who goes by Pendragon’s Pocket on YouTube has a Read Aloud Book Tour playlist of classics and newer fare, from The Giver to The Selection. Each video includes a discussion of the excerpt at the end. Each video includes a reading and discussion of the first few pages, with the goal of seeing “if this book ‘hooks’ you as a reader.”

The Medicine Hat Public Library in Canada has used YouTube for summer reading. In the read-aloud video series, the youth and community librarian has read Iain Lawrence’s The Skeleton Tree and Dusti Bowling’s Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus.

This spring, Elizabeth from Finkelstein Memorial Library in Spring Valley, NY, read “Oomph” by Emery Lord from the YA romance anthology Meet Cute.

Author Image
Katy Hershberger
Katy Hershberger (khershberger@mediasource.com) is the senior editor for YA at School Library Journal.
Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?