June 21, 2018

The Advocate's Toolbox

Off to ALA and ISTE (and how to follow along when you’re #notat . . .)

I’ll be off to New Orleans this week and then Chicago after that for my fairly regular attempt to attend two overlapping conferences. I am not complaining, but it’s good to know how to follow along or catch up with the events on your own time during and after the fact.  Last year I felt […]

Highlights Hangout launches: a sonic spin on a classic kids favorite

Just in time for road-trip season comes the new free monthly podcast series, Highlights Hangout  Launched this week, the series is a collaboration between the makers of the popular and iconic Highlights For Children magazine (now 72-years old!) and the creators of NPR’s also popular science podcast Wow in the World, both produced in partnership with Tinkercast.com, a leading producer of educational audio. […]

The Great American Read and its sweet by-products

I was mesmerized by the two-hour launch of PBS Great American Read campaign.  While I believe choosing one book is impossible and not actually the point of this celebration,  I was enchanted by one compelling little book talk after another.  And it was delightful to listen to people talk with such passion about their books. Yesterday, I discovered When […]

LOC introduces its Story Maps

Around a month ago, the Library of Congress announced new curatorial strategies for interactive storytelling around its diverse collections with its Story Maps. The stories offer users engaging ways to access these collections and leverage data using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and a new story platform created by ESRI a corporate leader in the areas of […]

On immersive technologies and the library: a visit with author Jamie Donally

Imagine the possibilities. of immersive virtual field trips–a walk through the solar system, the experience of a tornado, a tour around a refugee camp of a science lab with the opportunity to fully explore, rotate and dissect a 3D model of the human body. of your students designing their own 360-degree, interactive, immersive stories with augmented […]

WalkWoke: an iOS app for your student activists (and a media literacy opp)

Your student activists are going to love WalkWoke.The iPhone app allows for the creative of impactful political posters to print, publish or share with meme-style ease.The app was launched in January by Tangelo, a venture studio and an innovation lab with a diverse team–built and founded by immigrant women. Posters were selected for their powerful and empathetic artwork drawn by real […]

On that video about non-book reading

A few days back I kinda jumped on a social media bandwagon reposting the Jimmy Kimmel video, Can you name a book? I cringed when I watched that video. And I had an icky feeling when I hit the Tweet button. But I did it anyway. Kimmel referred to a Pew survey released in March that explored […]

Google Science Journal: A lab in your pocket

Sometimes an app truly demonstrates the power of mobile. Google’s Science Journal app transforms your mobile device into a little science laboratory, encouraging students to conduct authentic experiments, collect and visualize data and record observations from the world around them. Use it to  enhance learning in your classrooms and in the field, and to facilitate the […]

A big list of options for connecting globally

As one school year closes and we have a little time to breathe and make plans for another. A little while back I began to collect a list of my favorite discoveries for engaging in global connections and participation for my pre-service grad students. Here’s the growing curation and below are a few highlights of […]

On wrapping it up with a meme: reflecting on the semester

Each semester I ask my Search and the Information Landscape sections to reflect on their learning by thinking about it figuratively and metaphorically, visualizing the landscape and their place in it. This year, I added the option of a meme to the visualization menu. I wonder what would happen if you asked your students to wrap […]

The 5-Clue Challenge (#5cluechallenge)

While planning a post compiling all the cool global literacy projects out there, I began having so much fun with one simple project that I decided it was worth its own little post. The 5 Clue Challenge is a traditional guessing game, kinda like Name that Tune. Here’s how it works. In short videos, students and […]

The Noun Project, impressively integrated

The Noun Project and I go way back.  It’s been my go-to icon-finder for creating infographics and presentations and for online course building. Launched as a Kickstarter in 2010, the site catalogs a huge array of symbols (over a million!) created by designers around the world. Artists agree to select either a public domain mark or a […]

SweetSearch: an update and three tools for your kids’ utility belts

I’ve been a longtime fan of findingDulcinea, a carefully curated portal for educators that I reviewed years ago. SweetSearch, its searchier sister site, is an excellent example of the power of a Google custom search engine to create a noise-free, focused search for children. Launched in 2009, SweetSearch leverages a Google CSE to search the websites included in findingDulcinea’s pathfinders […]

Fake News or Free Speech: Is There a Right to be Misinformed? (Free webinar!)

I am delighted to participate in a free webinar next week that reaches across libraryland. Fake News or Free Speech: Is There a Right to be Misinformed? will be a live session at ALA Annual this summer, but we’re presenting a preview on Wednesday, April 25 courtesy of the Freedom to Read Foundation and the Office of […]

Google’s new Talk to Books: Semantic search for book and idea discovery

I am truly excited about sharing this new approach to search!  Imagine if you had the power to ask authors across time and disciplines your most burning questions or for their best advice.  Now you can. This week TED curator Chris Anderson and futurist Ray Kurzweil introduced Talk to Books. The feature was developed by a Google Research team […]

Google’s new Talk to Books: Semantic search for book and idea discovery

I am truly excited about sharing this new approach to search!  Imagine if you had the power to ask authors across time and disciplines your most burning questions or for their best advice.  Now you can. This week TED curator Chris Anderson and futurist Ray Kurzweil introduced Talk to Books. The feature was developed by a Google Research team […]

Your YAs are going to want to hear this: Audiobook SYNC is back

It’s back! Now in its 9th annual season, Audiobook SYNC just announced its free book pairings for teen listeners for this spring and summer.  You can dig into the first of the weekly pairings on April 26th. at 7:00 PM Eastern. Each week from April 26 through July 25, SYNC will release two high-interest titles for young adult readers. […]

One Book One School/Book Club Solutions

When I left Springfield, I had at least 15 copies each of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, The Soloist and Unbroken lying around.  A few copies of each were on the shelves; many more were crowded on the bottom shelves in our workroom, several copies deep. What do we do with the leftover books […]

A video visit with your academic librarian: an idea for your seniors

One of my exceptional former students, Lawrence (NJ) High School librarian Ewa Elliot, hosted a meeting a couple of weeks back. She invited middle and high school, public and academic librarians to have a conversation about Ewa scheduled time for us to chat about: our current programs across the board preparing students for life after […]

PuppetMaster: An app to inspire animated storytelling

I’ve been exploring the new PuppetMaster app and I am enchanted.  I see serious potential for this free, intuitive, open-ended tool to encourage creativity across a wide range of ages, from pre-school to adult! PuppetMaster allows children to animate anything and to record their action and sound to create movies. It encourages the creation of visual art in any medium and […]