DVDS

Flesh & Blood So Cheap: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy

By . 4 CDs. 4:21 hrs. Prod. by Listening Library. Dist. by Listening Library/Books on Tape. 2012. ISBN 978-0-449-01476-9. $30.
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RedReviewStarGr 5 Up—Albert Marrin takes the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire of 1911 and uses it as a jumping-off point to discuss immigration and working conditions in the early 20th century in his powerful National Book Award nominee (Knopf, 2011). The fire, which was the most devastating disaster in New York City's history until the terrorist attack of 2001, created huge cause for concern in the factories and sweatshops in America at the time. The immigrants, who had been working exceedingly long hours in unsafe conditions to make ends meet, were suddenly encouraged to join unions that would fight to give them workers' rights. With this catalytic event, new laws were put in place to protect workers, many of the rights that we enjoy and take for granted today can be directly linked to this time period. John H. Mayer's straightforward and even delivery takes listeners step-by-step through the history leading to the immigrant work culture existing in New York City at the time of the Triangle Fire. Although the audiobook can stand on its own, have the print version available so listeners can peruse the numerous photos. A must-have addition to school and public library nonfiction collections.–Jessica Miller, West Springfield Public Library, CT

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