Video Sunday: I Walk It Like I Talk It With a Wocket in My Pocket

Maybe it was School of Rock that started the interest in working with children. Certainly the Goosebumps movie was an indication, and who can forget Jumanji? However you want to look at it, Jack Black at some point in the proceedings became the friendly face of children’s books adapted to the big screen. Considering the […]

Maybe it was School of Rock that started the interest in working with children. Certainly the Goosebumps movie was an indication, and who can forget Jumanji? However you want to look at it, Jack Black at some point in the proceedings became the friendly face of children’s books adapted to the big screen. Considering the fact that this book would make a difficult movie to begin with, I take no issue with the liberties you’ll see on screen. There appear to be creepy moving automatons involved in some way which, for me, spells awesome. So am on board with this. Fully.

If you watched this and thought it had a bit of a Brian Selznick influence to it, you are not alone. How much more appropriate, then, to discover this video that introduces us to Selznick’s new Harry Potter covers. My only question is whether or not he’ll have done any interior art as well (please say yes, please say yes, please say yes . . .).

I got that video from 100 Scope Notes, by the way. You should check out his post What’s Your Emergency? for a truly great video he discovered on YouTube when he plugged in the search term “children’s books.”

Next up, the concept of acceptance. Teaching it to kids was always considered an easy enough activity, but as the decades have shown it takes more than a bit of the old “I’m okay, you’re okay” to drill that message home.

Enter Anny Rusk and Christina Hoover Moorehead. Two women giving it their all with a new YouTube series. They explain it far better than I:

“Can we be honest here? Anny just can’t accept that her dog doesn’t understand human speech. She is worried she’ll never be able to tell her dog how much she loves him. She tried licking him on his head—as a mother dog would—but her tongue swelled up. Christina can’t bring herself to agree with Anny’s dog-licking experiment, and to be honest Christina isn’t quite sure she approves of dog-licking as a form of pet owner communication. But Christina accepts that it is important to Anny that she show her dog love. The ability to accept that which is different is an on-going challenge for humans—and is something about which we are desperately curious. Our goal is to join with other equally curious people to explore acceptance. Our exploration will dig into the roles that fear, personal identity, playfulness and a sense of wonder have in our interactions with each other. Our guiding question: must we have agreement or approval in order to accept that which is different?

Your Hosts: Anny Rusk, www.annyrusk.com, Twitter: @annyrusk

Christina Hoover Moorehead, YouTube: Nerdopause, Twitter: @shoganai”

And here we go:

Good news. We’ve finally determined the best possible rap pairing with Dr. Seuss. Turns out, if you pair a Migos flow with either a Seuss book or Anna Dewdney, you get gold. NPR was the first to point this fact out, and I tip my hat to them.

Here you will find rapper Win Nevaluze doing a dramatic reading of the Dr. Seuss easy reader Wocket In My Pocket, to the time of Migos’ current single “Walk It Like I Talk It.”

As for our off-topic video of the day, I don’t really know this fellow. He showed up in my Facebook feed and I fell for him. Or, rather, I fell for the feelings behind this video. In terms of getting out the door, the zipper part is dead dead dead on.

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