Report: High Schoolers' Lack of Digital Literacy Skills Is “Troubling”

The Stanford History Education Group gave thousands of high school students "civic online reasoning" assessments to gauge their digital media literacy skills.

The Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) gave thousands of high school students "civic online reasoning" assessments to gauge their digital media literacy skills. The report based on the test describes the results as "troubling."

With an eye toward the 2020 presidential election,  political misinformation, and voting eligibility of some high school students, the exercises tested the students' ability to evaluate digital sources. Ninety percent of the students failed to get any credit on four of the six assessments they took.

The full report can be viewed here. See below for the summary.

For educators interested in media and digital literacy focused on civics, SHEG developed civic online reasoning lesson plans for middle and high school students. 

 

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