360 Video Spotlight: National Geographic and The New York Times

Today, I came face to face with an elephant, accompanied Iraqi forces as they fought to retake Falluja, and I rode along with police officers in Flint, and I tended bar for Don Cheadle. Storytelling is evolving and thrilling and sometimes dizzying. National Geographic has been growing a very cool YouTube playlist of 360° Videos.  […]

Today, I came face to face with an elephant, accompanied Iraqi forces as they fought to retake Falluja, and I rode along with police officers in Flint, and I tended bar for Don Cheadle.

Storytelling is evolving and thrilling and sometimes dizzying.

National Geographic has been growing a very cool YouTube playlist of 360° Videos.  These videos allow us to see things differently–to fly above the the canopies of the giant sequoias, to plunge into a Caribbean coral reef, or to go back in time to experience the breadth of a Viking battle.

Currently 17 videos allow you to experience a natural or historic setting by spinning your device to see the scene from multiple angles. Online, the video is pretty cool itself, but it’s far more spectacular when you view the experience on Google Cardboard or another virtual reality viewer.

If you have a Cardboard or other VR viewer, simply load the YouTube playlist on your phone and click on the little VR headset icon on the bottom right of the video. You’ll senatgeo360e the little split screen and you’ll be ready to insert the device in your headset and wander around new environments and adventures. natgeo360split
Here’s a list of the current 360 adventure options:

You can keep up with new releases on the NatGeo Facebook page.

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