February 23, 2018

The Advocate's Toolbox

Professional Reading on Fandom, Library Spaces, & More

Readers interested in adding to their professional reading collections will find plenty, from a volume on tapping into fandoms to an insightful work on encouraging children to read.

This article was published in School Library Journal's January 2018 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

How My Library Doubled Its Circulation

A librarian’s Reading Empathy Initiative cultivates student reading endurance in a distracted world. Here’s how.

Reading challenges/resolutions for the new year

This time of year is ripe for resolutions. It’s a good time to resolve to read and, perhaps, to resolve to change things up a bit. The new year may be the perfect time to invite your kids to read a little differently–to suggest they build personal challenges based on their own passions, as well as an […]

A true gift from SHEG: DIY digital literacy assessments and tools for historical thinking

You may remember Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) for its groundbreaking and utterly depressing report, Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Online Civic Reasoning. In the November 2016 Executive Summary, the researchers shared: When thousands of students respond to dozens of tasks there are endless variations. That was certainly the case in our experience. However, at each level—middle […]

Smiles of Bibliophiles: Celebrating Books and Reading

Share these titles to celebrate the importance and empowerment of literacy and to set the tone for a book-loving school year.

Fast-Tracking a More Radical Approach to Literacies | Editorial

How we engage in programming and teaching literacy is getting more interesting as librarians creatively tackle the massive literacy challenge, even crisis, we face.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2017 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

The Reader

The Reader by Traci Chee Putnam, August 2016 Reviewed from an ARC This is a book I’ve been saving the whole season, saving until the end because I knew I’d love it and I wanted to savor it. I’m not alone in loving it — it has four stars, it’s on the SLJ Mothership’s year […]

Introduce myShakespeare to your students!

Fun fact: You may know I was an English major. You may not know that my serious focus was 16th century poetry and drama. My favorite course ever was Shakespeare’s Problem Plays. Not every student I’ve met over the years felt the same draw to Shakespeare. The play is just not every kid’s thing. The […]

On “poetical science” and making beyond the “space”

In his history of the digital revolution, The Innovators, Walter Isaacson reveals Ada Lovelace’s significant legacy–that the humanities and technology could happily coexist as a poetical science. This particular coexistence, he notes, does not usually exist in our schools. Many people who celebrate the arts and the humanities, who applaud vigorously the tributes to their […]

Behold the Power of Reading; Or, how my 8-year-old was inspired to start her own #TrashTuesdays

Last Saturday, Thing 2 turned 8. For her birthday, a friend sent her the following three books: Monday night, The Teen, Thing 2 and I curled up and bed and read them together. We cried as we read Malala’s story. We were inspired as we read about Barrack Obama and Hillary Clinton. One thing that […]

Amazon “Rapids” App Offers Kids Short Stories

Amazon’s new app for kids ages 7–12 brings them original short stores that unfold in snippets of chat style text on e-readers and cell phones.

CommonLit: OER Curation and Creation

As librarians, wehn we gear up for a new school year, it’s exciting to have a few new strategies for engaging learners with literature and for building our own literature discovery/selection toolkit. You’ll absolutely want to introduce CommonLit to your classroom teachers and you’ll absolutely use it yourself to make curricular discoveries and to help […]

Tales2Go as an audio collection (and a literacy solution)

I LOVE audiobooks!  They make it possible for me to always be reading. But for kiddos, access to audiobooks represents far more than a simple, hands-free convenience. Audiobooks allow children to build vocabulary, to attack sophisticated text and ideas beyond their current reading levels, Audiobooks can introduce children to new vocabulary, improve reading comprehension and fluency, […]

Take 5: Memoirs on writing to hand to aspiring teen authors

“How do you become an author?” We’ve heard teens ask that question every time they meet an author – published, famous, or neither. And we’ve all heard the answer too: read. Read everything. Read more. No, even more than that. Reading is essential. But more than novels, teens who are firmly dedicated to the writing life […]

#READTransformed: remixing the celebrity poster

Perhaps it’s an inside librarian joke, but I so love this idea. I think it was Topeka Library that started the #READTransformed meme. If you’ve collected ALA’s Celebrity READ posters in your library, your students and faculty may just jump on board to help you reinterpret and remix these classics. So, pick a hero. Strike […]

Wonderful news! The launch of the Open eBooks app for your children in need

Some wonderful news!  First Lady Michelle Obama’s video below announces a significant new initiative designed to address the challenge of providing children living in low income households with equitable access to digital reading materials. Open eBooks, is a free app, offering thousands of popular and award-winning titles, available without checkout or cost.  It targets all […]

Freeing writers AND readers

I agree with Allie Jane Bruce that “kids say this stuff” is a piss-poor reason for racist language in books for children. It’s a piss-poor reason generally, as the point of fiction has never been to mimic reality, which rarely makes nearly as much sense as even the most hackneyed novel. Fiction is always selecting: as Miss Binney explained to Ramona, […]

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Kindoma: a shared reading experience

I love the idea of expanding the reading experience–of making it a special, social, connected experience even when the kids we love are not in our laps. Parents, grandparents and read-aloud buddies of all flavors, will want to take a look at Kindoma. Available for iPhone and iPad, the free app allows two users to […]

What is your reading personality? Which reading super-hero are you?

How do you find just the right book to recommend for a kid?  It’s trickier than discovering that they like mysteries or even a very specific type of science fiction. What makes a certain book a yes for one kid reader and a clear no for another? The question deeply troubled former independent children’s bookseller […]

Putting it together

After ALA, we had a couple of days to visit with our kids and grandchildren up in sunny Marin. One afternoon, Miles (just turned six) and I were walking back from the playground when a friendly neighbor lady approached and pressed an envelope into Miles’s hands. “Oh, I know what this is,” he said, “it’s […]

The post Putting it together appeared first on The Horn Book.