June 24, 2018

The Advocate's Toolbox

On that video about non-book reading

A few days back I kinda jumped on a social media bandwagon reposting the Jimmy Kimmel video, Can you name a book? I cringed when I watched that video. And I had an icky feeling when I hit the Tweet button. But I did it anyway. Kimmel referred to a Pew survey released in March that explored […]

Fake News or Free Speech: Is There a Right to be Misinformed? (Free webinar!)

I am delighted to participate in a free webinar next week that reaches across libraryland. Fake News or Free Speech: Is There a Right to be Misinformed? will be a live session at ALA Annual this summer, but we’re presenting a preview on Wednesday, April 25 courtesy of the Freedom to Read Foundation and the Office of […]

Negotiating Nuance

Recently, I was honored to be invited to speak at the 21CLHK Conference in Hong Kong. One of my archived talks addressed the Noah principle–why predicting rain doesn’t count, and why building arks does–as it relates to the credibility crisis or the challenges of container collapse. I see so many opportunities for us to take […]

News literacy tools: Advice, four sites and a new app (Swiipe)

One of the reasons our students find and use news that is less than credible is that their news habits are less than energetic. Among the ten key trends Pew researchers gathered from among their research reports on social and news media were: Use of mobile devices for news continues to grow. Two-thirds of Americans […]

Thinking with the Super Bowl

Here in Philadelphia, we’re particularly excited about this year’s Super Bowl. It’s a bit of a challenge to remember that a lot of learning that can happen beyond what happens on the field. Each year, media literacy consultant Frank Baker reminds me that this major sports event is also particularly ripe for media literacy learning. In a […]

A true gift from SHEG: DIY digital literacy assessments and tools for historical thinking

You may remember Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) for its groundbreaking and utterly depressing report, Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Online Civic Reasoning. In the November 2016 Executive Summary, the researchers shared: When thousands of students respond to dozens of tasks there are endless variations. That was certainly the case in our experience. However, at each level—middle […]

13 Tips for Teaching News and Information Literacy

Experts share their most successful teaching methods for elementary and middle schoolers.

The Fake-News Fad: Let it Fade | Opinion

When teachers and administrators prod us to address this “new and urgent” concern, let us remind them that we’ve been doing that, and so much more, all along.

On student scrutiny: two strategies

We’re focusing a lot of attention these days of helping students determine credibility. For many of us, this is not a hot new topic. I dug around a bit and dusted off a couple of tools that, I think, stand the test of time.  You are welcome to make copies and retool them for you […]

UNESCO Launches Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL)

This week UNESCO launched a framework illustrating its Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL). This global strategy marries the large, but often separated, disciplines of information literacy and media literacy and creates a common vocabulary for folks in multiple areas of knowledge to engage in conversation. It also positions these critical literacies as […]

Allsides: Curating diverse perspectives (or looking at news from most sides now)

Free people from filter bubbles so they can better understand the world and each other. AllSides.com mission It’s a search tool. It’s a conversation opener. It’s a bubble burster. Though I just discovered it, the news aggregator AllSides has been around for around four years as a platform that curates and uses crowd-sourcing technology to […]

SLJ’s News Literacy Pinterest Page

An up-to-date news literacy resource curated by school media and ed tech specialist Jen Thomas.

Faked Out | Editorial

The news literacy gap is today’s information crisis.

This article was published in School Library Journal's January 2017 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Friday Finds – January 6, 2017

Hello TLTers. Today Friday Finds is being brought to you by me, Karen, because Robin Willis is at a training session on food insecurity and some other youth related issues. I’m sure she’ll be sharing what she learned soon in an upcoming post. So here are this weeks Friday Finds. TLT this Week What’s In […]

The Smell Test: Educators can counter fake news with information literacy. Here’s how.

In the era of fake news, librarians are our best hope for educating kids about bogus reporting, biased points of view, and more.

This article was published in School Library Journal's January 2017 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Teaching Information Literacy Now

Laura Gardner, 2016 SLJ School Librarian of the Year finalist, updates her lesson plans for the era of fake news.

Truth, truthiness, triangulation and the librarian way: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world

We were guaranteed a free press,  We were not guaranteed a neutral or a true press. We can celebrate the journalistic freedom to publish without interference from the state.  We can also celebrate our freedom to share multiple stories through multiple lenses. But it has always been up to the reader or viewer to make […]

FTC Complaint Takes Aim at YouTube

Groups, including the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, want online ads that target kids curtailed.

Five Questions for Kids’ Media Literacy Expert Frank W. Baker

How can kids deconstruct Super Bowl ads? Or distinguish authentic news items online from manufactured content? Insight on this and more from Media Literacy Clearinghouse founder Frank W. Baker.

On magazine covers and media literacy

Whether they are composed of photographs or illustrations, magazine covers are one of many examples of media offering candidates free coverage.  They are also carefully constructed media messages ripe for closer reading and deconstruction to further our students’ digital, visual and political literacies. In his recent article in MiddleWeb, media literacy expert and consultant Frank […]