December 4, 2016

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The Book Palace: One Librarian’s Adventure at the Library of Congress

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The Library of Congress Summer Teaching Institute turned out to be a dream come true for an elementary school library media specialist.

DPLA Primary Source Sets

Just in time for instructional planning, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) reminds us that their 100 Primary Source Sets were designed  to help students develop critical thinking skills by exploring topics in history, literature, and culture. If you work with middle or high school learners, you’re going to love these sets created by the teachers from […]

In on the joke: Political cartoons and the election

We want our kids to be in on the joke. As I mentioned last time around (or in 2012), presidential elections present ultimate, authentic teachable moments, opportunities for us to exploring a variety of literacies with learners at all levels. Political cartoons are everywhere. These powerful little works of editorial art and sharp, nuanced thinking […]

Primary Sources Go Mobile; African American History Site Debuts | Tech Bites

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This month’s Tech Bites news roundup features a variety of the latest digital resources for students.

Shakespeare Documented

This year marks the 400 anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare. One way to celebrate this significant commemoration is to explore Shakespeare Documented, the largest and most authoritative resource for learning about primary sources surrounding the life and career of William Shakespeare.  A collaboration among more than 30 partners including the Bodleian Libraries at […]

Remixing with NYPL #nyplremix

This week, New York Public Library released more than of its 187,000 public domain images free to share, reuse and remix. The collection of high resolution images spans the breadth and depth of NYPL’s holdings–historic maps, atlases, botanical illustrations, manuscripts, photographs, ancient religious texts, and, of course, the New York City collection. Now open and […]

Celebrating the lives of the uncelebrated: StoryCorps.me

What if Anne Frank hadn’t kept her diary? What if no one could listen to Martin Luther King’s Mountaintop speech? What if the camera hadn’t been rolling during the first moon landing? But what if, this Thanksgiving, the youngest member of every family interviewed the oldest? Or if on February 14th, you asked a person […]

Ben’s Guide relaunches

In collaboration with our own AASL, the Government Printing Office just updated and redesigned its Ben’s Guide to the U.S. Government. This new portal is designed to inform students, parents, and educators about the Federal Government, which issues the publications and information products disseminated by the GPO’s Federal Depository Library Program. Mobile friendly, the website […]

New from the National Constitution Center: an Interactive Constitution

It’s Constitution Day and the National Constitution Center just launched an Interactive Constitution, perfect for high school and university study. The podcast announcement, hosted by Jeffrey Rosen, the Center’s president and CEO,  celebrates the launch and offers detailed project background on the project. The three-year project, currently covers the first 15 Amendments and invites students […]

Old Maps on new devices

Teachers and lovers of history and geography are going to love this new app. Old Maps, available for iPhone, iPad or any Android device through Google Play, allows mobile access to more than 250,000 high resolution, historical maps from the 15th to the 20th century, from across the world.  Only a few years ago, we […]

AP Archive now free and on YouTube!

This week the Associated Press, the world’s largest and oldest news agency, announced that its entire Archive is viewable on YouTube, and that it will be adding new material every day.  This is an INCREDIBLE treasure for educators who teach history, culture, science, current events, global studies, media literacy–pretty much anything.  I can easily imagine […]

Digital Public Library of America Seeks Educator Advisors

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If you’re a humanities educator who works with students in grades 6 through college, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) wants to hear from you. With a $96,000 grant, DPLA is seeking applicants to join an Education Advisory Committee to create resources to support student research.

Free civil rights programs using presidential primary sources

Free civil rights programs using presidential primary sources

Now through March, the Presidential Primary Sources Project (PPSP), a partnership involving the National Park Service, U.S. Presidential Libraries and Museums and other cultural and historic organizations, and the Internet2 community, offer an exciting series of free programs for students. Designed for grades 6 through 12, the programs created by ten historic sites and libraries, […]

Yale Photogrammar revitalizes and adds new context to the FSA-OWI images

Yale Photogrammar revitalizes and adds new context to the FSA-OWI images

Last week I was so excited to discover the Internet Archive Book Images project.  Yesterday (also via @infodocket) I discovered Photogrammar– a digital humanities project from Yale University. Exploiting Library of Congress metadata, the Photogrammar team created a web-based platform for organizing, searching, and visualizing the 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945 created by the […]

Explore Some ‘Best-Loved’ Nursery Rhymes, Navigate Girl World with a Mother-Daughter Book-Club, and More | Professional Reading

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Katherine Goiver’s Half for You and Half for Me gives readers the inside scoop behind nursery rhymes we all know and love, while Lori Day and Charlotte Kugler’s Her Next Chapter provides the skinny on how mother-daughter book clubs offer a guide to helping girls through those difficult teen years in this month’s crop of Professional Reading titles.

This article was published in School Library Journal's August 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Commencement: What do the speeches teach us?

Commencement: What do the speeches tell us?

If you are connected to a university, you’ve likely already gotten your annual dose of inspiration. If you are connected to a high school, you are either awaiting that traditional commencement moment, or preparing for it. Commencement speeches are also interesting to study. They are primary sources.  They are models for learning about rhetoric.  And […]

The GPO expands free eBook access

The GPO expands free eBook access

Earlier this week, the US Government Printing Office announced the expansion of its ebook program to increase public access to government publications. Though the initial release was limited to 100 titles, the plan is to make new titles available each month free of charge. The public, and that includes students and teachers, will now have full-text […]

Teaching Inquiry with Library of Congress Primary Sources | Tech Tidbits

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Why should we study primary source documents? These are artifacts created by the people who lived through the events and time periods under study. Providing students the opportunity to study primary sources can give rise to student inquiry and encourage them to speculate about each source, its creator, and the context in which it was produced. The Library of Congress has millions of primary source documents and tools for teachers and students to dig into, 24/7.

Searching Google for contemporaneous news

Searching Google for contemporaneous news

A few years back, I mourned the loss of Google’s New Timeline. I still miss that beautiful visual presentation, but you can still use Google News to search contemporaneous news. Contemporaneous news offers students unfiltered, personal connection to the past and forces them to wrestle with issues of bias and historical perspective. Contemporaneous news focuses a media literacy […]

Memoirs: Stories From a Life | Focus On

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These first-person narratives introduce readers to the subjects’ lives and experiences and help to preserve history through the eyes of someone who was there. They make for compelling reading—and are great choices for meeting the Common Core requirements for nonfiction.

This article was published in School Library Journal's October 2013 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.