November 20, 2017

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Middle School Students Explore Representation in “A Fine Dessert” | In the Classroom

A NYC middle school teacher uses the controversial picture book Fine Dessert to teach about stereotype and representation.

Experts Focus on Censorship at Bank Street Conference

At “Who Are You To Say?”, an event held in New York City on April 16, authors and kid lit experts weighed in on where to draw the line between being aware and censoring.

Assessing Controversial Books | Scales on Censorship

Should libraries that already purchased books based on their starred reviews keep or withdraw them because of subsequent controversies?

This article was published in School Library Journal's February 2016 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Scholastic Yanks Controversial Picture Book

The new release “A Birthday Cake for George Washington” draws heated criticism for its depiction of slaves, in similar fashion to “A Fine Dessert.”

SLJ’s Top Posts of 2015

From a controversial state bill to new ways to approach reading with teens and Minecraft, our top posts of the year were an eclectic mix.

Why This Book? The Conundrum of Virality and A Fine Dessert

Friends, Romans, Countrymen. Lend me your ears.  I come to discuss A Fine Dessert, not to praise it or denigrate it.  Not to really talk much about the book itself at all except as a recent phenomenon.  A phenomenon unique to our particular day and age and that remains relatively mysterious, despite (or perhaps because […]

NYC DOE Conference: Reaching Diverse Learners

“Libraries for ALL Learners” was this year’s theme at the New York City Department of Education’s Library Services Annual Fall Conference, which convened at CitiField in Flushing. The session encompassed diversity in culture, ability, learning styles, gender and sexual identity.

NYCSL Conference Showcases New Literacy Initiative and a Thought-Provoking Panel on Diversity

At the recent fall conference for NYC School Librarians, educators learned about the new Read 365 initiative, and a thought-provoking conversation about diversity and the controversy around A Fine Dessert generated buzz.

Emily Jenkins Apologizes for “A Fine Dessert”

Describing her book as “racially insensitive,” author Emily Jenkins took to the web Sunday to apologize for her picture book A Fine Dessert, announcing her intent to donate her writing fee to We Need Diverse Books, which has been confirmed by the organization.