June 25, 2017

Subscribe to SLJ

SLJ’s 2015 School Librarian of the Year Award Open for Entries

MichelleColte_byDanaEdmunds

Michelle Colte, last year’s winner.

Submissions are open for School Library Journal‘s second annual 2015 School Librarian of the Year (SLOY) Award, sponsored by Scholastic Library Publishing. K–12 librarians in the United States who have a story to share about their library’s exemplary use of 21st-century tools and services to engage children and teens and fostering multiple literacies in school are encouraged to apply starting April 1.

Applicants will be in the running for a $2,500 cash prize, $2,500 worth of print and digital materials from Scholastic Library Publishing, and will be profiled in a feature article in the September 2015 issue of SLJ. In addition, the winner will receive an invitation to the SLJ Leadership Summit in Seattle, WA, on September 26–27, 2015, and $750 of the winner’s prize money will be allocated toward travel to that event. Two finalists will each receive $500 in materials of their choice from Scholastic Library Publishing and will be featured with the winner on SLJ.com.

Applicants can nominate themselves. For official guidelines on eligibility and how to apply, visit the award website.

Last year’s SLOY winner, Michelle Colte, a library media specialist from the Hale Kula Elementary School in Wahiawa, HI, will serve on this year’s panel of judges. Colte was honored alongside finalists, Andy Plemmons of David C. Barrow Elementary School in Athens, GA, and Colleen Graves of Lamar Middle School in Flower Mound, TX.

Graves rallies librarians to share their stories and apply.

Plemmons explains that applying is “our chance to redefine what a library is.”

Nominations close on May 22, and winners will be announced on July 1, 2015. To apply, email sljlibrarianofyear@mediasourceinc.com. For more information, visit the award website.

Share
SLJTeen Live! Virtual Conference
Join us on August 9 for SLJTeen Live! This free, entirely virtual conference will feature more than 20 YA author panelists and keynote speakers, plus two hours of panels on innovative and creative approaches to teen services and programming. No teen librarian will want to miss it.