May 24, 2018

The Advocate's Toolbox

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The Best Man

I was very sad to get the news that Richard Peck died late last night after a long illness which, goodness did he battle! He spent his last year doing everything he loved the best, almost all of which involved great feats of travel. Horn Book articles by and about this inimitable writer (I think […]

Book Review: All Summer Long by Hope Larson

Publisher’s description A coming-of-age middle-grade graphic novel about summer and friendships, written and illustrated by the Eisner Award–winning and New York Times–bestselling Hope Larson. Thirteen-year-old Bina has a long summer ahead of her. She and her best friend, Austin, usually do everything together, but he’s off to soccer camp for a month, and he’s been acting […]

WalkWoke: an iOS app for your student activists (and a media literacy opp)

Your student activists are going to love WalkWoke.The iPhone app allows for the creative of impactful political posters to print, publish or share with meme-style ease.The app was launched in January by Tangelo, a venture studio and an innovation lab with a diverse team–built and founded by immigrant women. Posters were selected for their powerful and empathetic artwork drawn by real […]

Summer Reading Chaos: How do we balance the needs of our community with those of our staff?

As my teens are counting down the days left in the school year, I find myself counting down the days until summer reading begin, but with very mixed emotions. This is my 25th year as a YA librarian, which means that it is the 25th summer reading program that I have planned. I have worked […]

Review: ‘The Dangerous Journey’

The Dangerous Journey Writer/artist: Tove Jansson Drawn and Quarterly; $16.95 The latest of Tove Jansson’s works to be republished in North America by Drawn and Quarterly is also the beloved artist’s last. Originally published in 1977, Jansson’s final picture book The Dangerous Journey is a particularly interesting last work, as it can now be read—whether […]

The Yarn LIVE at ALA!

Travis: We’re looking forward to this:

The Yarn is going LIVE in New Orleans for ALA Annual. If you’ll be there, we’d love to see you.

Review of the Day: Seeing Into Tomorrow by Richard Wright and Nina Crews

Seeing Into Tomorrow Haiku by Richard Wright Biography and illustrations by Nina Crews Millbrook Press (a division of Lerner) $19.99 ISBN: 978-1-5124-1865-1 Ages 6-10 On shelves now I hate that phrase, “A picture’s worth a thousand words”. It’s trite. Simplistic. And horrendously true. Pictures have power. Take the story that’s been handed to us about […]

On that video about non-book reading

A few days back I kinda jumped on a social media bandwagon reposting the Jimmy Kimmel video, Can you name a book? I cringed when I watched that video. And I had an icky feeling when I hit the Tweet button. But I did it anyway. Kimmel referred to a Pew survey released in March that explored […]

Global Literature to Teach Global Understanding

Global Literature To Teach Global Understanding This spring, several new books that foster global understanding for childhood audiences have been released that are written and illustrated by international authors and illustrators. While these works of global literature certainly stand on their own, collectively they offer classrooms an opportunity for students to grow deeper understandings of […]

Review: ‘Zen Pencils: Inspirational Quotes for Kids’

Zen Pencils: Inspirational Quotes for Kids by Gavin Aung Than Andrews McMeel, $9.99 Ages 7-12 years The quotes in Zen Pencils: Inspirational Quotes for Kids are oddly chosen. The second is about training to avoid bleeding in battle, attributed to an Armed Forces motto, a strange choice to lead off a book of advice for […]

#ReadForChange: Get Really Real with Lilliam Rivera’s The Education of Margot Sanchez, a guest post by Marie Marquardt

Teen Librarian Toolbox is excited to be partnering with Marie Marquardt for her #ReadForChange project. Hop on over to this post to learn more about the initiative. Today, she and Lilliam Rivera join us for a conversation about gentrification, taking action, writing a novel that is just one voice of the many unheard voices in the publishing industry, and her excellent book […]

DNA Profiling Program Recap by Michelle Biwer

A local branch of the international biotechnology corporation Thermo Fisher conducts outreach every year in my community. They approached our library system with offers of free programs they could run at the library for our patrons. A group of scientists from Thermo Fisher came to share a 1.5 hour program about DNA profiling for teens […]

Review: Illegal

Eoin Colfer is well-known for his many novels for middle-grade readers. His Artemis Fowl series, about a teenage criminal mastermind, has been popular for well over ten years and was adapted into a graphic novel. More recently, Colfer has set out to write an original graphic novel. Illegal By Eoin Colfer. Andrew Donkin. Giovanni Rigano […]

You’re So Vain: Book-Related Vanity License Plates

I was in the car yesterday when I spotted this while waiting for a red light: Nice work, fellow driver! It got me thinking about people I know who have book-related vanity plates. My friend (and world-class school librarian) Cindy Dobrez has one (she credits Little Brother by Cory Doctorow as inspiration): John Schumacher has […]

Cover Reveal and Dual Interview: Wings by Cheryl Klein, ill. Tomie dePaola

Okay. So I kinda sorta intensely love this. First off, remember Cheryl Klein? A.k.a. the continuity editor of Harry Potter? A.k.a. one of the best editors of our age who not too long ago left Scholastic to work for Lee & Low Books? I’ve known Cheryl for years. We used to do Kidlit Drink Nights […]

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: The Stinky Cheese Man by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith

I’d like to offer a word of warning to my mother with this one. Somehow, this ended up being our longest episode. Mom, if you listen to this on the treadmill, you might do yourself a serious injury. It’s a whopping 48:17 (and that’s edited down!). I guess it’s not surprising when you do a […]

Sunday Reflections: This is what happened when the The Teen asked me if .gov websites were trustworthy

I’m sitting in the Teen MakerSpace when my phone beeps and I see I have a text from The Teen: “Are .gov websites trustworthy,” she asks. And before responding, I pause. In the past, I would have said yes without that pause. That’s one of the things I have always taught my teens, one of […]

Preview: ‘Looney Tunes’ #243

Here’s a first look at Looney Tunes #243, which serves up another heaping helping of timeless humor—this time with a Wild West theme: An Old West-style amusement park gets a little too real when visitors Elmer and Daffy get into trouble with park employees—or are they?—Bugs Bunny, Yosemite Sam and the Tasmanian Devil! It’s the […]

Google Science Journal: A lab in your pocket

Sometimes an app truly demonstrates the power of mobile. Google’s Science Journal app transforms your mobile device into a little science laboratory, encouraging students to conduct authentic experiments, collect and visualize data and record observations from the world around them. Use it to  enhance learning in your classrooms and in the field, and to facilitate the […]

Books on Film: Can You Name a Book? *Any* Book?

Credit to Judy Freeman for this one – I saw it because she shared it on Facebook.
The Jimmy Kimmel Show took to the street to see if people could name a book. One book. Any book. Just AH book.
Now, please try not to get too depressed.