April 21, 2018

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Friday Finds: April 20, 2018

This Week at TLT #ReadForChange: Jodi Lynn Anderson’s Midnight at the Electric and climate change, a guest post by Marie Marquardt YA A to Z: H is for Historical Fiction, a guest post by librarian Amanda Perez Post-it Note Reviews of Elementary and Middle Grade Books YA A to Z: Friends and Troublemakers, a guest […]

Fake News or Free Speech: Is There a Right to be Misinformed? (Free webinar!)

I am delighted to participate in a free webinar next week that reaches across libraryland. Fake News or Free Speech: Is There a Right to be Misinformed? will be a live session at ALA Annual this summer, but we’re presenting a preview on Wednesday, April 25 courtesy of the Freedom to Read Foundation and the Office of […]

The story on the wall

Seeing the CSK exhibit at the NCCIL is making me remember again the vogue for illustration as fine art we had in the 1980s:  from a baby boom arose lots of picture books, lots of children’s bookstores, and (he gestures vaguely towards) developments in five-color printing that encouraged big, handsome pictures in big, handsome books. And […]

This Week’s Comics: Heroes and Legends

Highlights from this week’s new releases include a new Casper series from American Mythology Productions, where everyone’s favorite friendly ghost teams up with other Harvey pals, starting with Wendy, the Good Little Witch in Casper and Wendy #1. First Second releases a new graphic novel about finding your place with Be Prepared while Lion Forge […]

#ReadForChange: Jodi Lynn Anderson’s Midnight at the Electric and climate change, a guest post by Marie Marquardt

Teen Librarian Toolbox is excited to be partnering with Marie Marquardt for her #ReadForChange project. Hop on over to this post to learn more about the initiative. Today, she and Jodi Lynn Anderson join us for a conversation about climate change and Anderson’s new novel, Midnight at the Electric.      We stand now where two roads diverge. But unlike the […]

Q&A and Cover Reveal: After Zero by Christina Collins

A lot of librarians are familiar with books in which a character, maybe the main character or a sibling or a friend, does not speak. The term I always thought applied to this situation was “selective mutism”. It’s so common in books that when I keep track of the books I read on Goodreads I’ve […]

Q&A and Cover Reveal: After Zero by Christina Collins

A lot of librarians are familiar with books in which a character, maybe the main character or a sibling or a friend, does not speak. The term I always thought applied to this situation was “selective mutism”. It’s so common in books that when I keep track of the books I read on Goodreads I’ve […]

One Star Review Guess Who (#66)

Can you guess the classic children’s book by its scathing one-star review on Goodreads or Amazon? Very nice present from cousins! Unfortunately, the page where all of the dots fall to one side made us very sad for some reason. Click here for the answer. Why do I share these? Click here. Previously . . […]

YA A to Z: H is for Historical Fiction, a guest post by librarian Amanda Perez

Today in our YA A to Z series, new librarian Amanda Perez joins us to talk about Historical Fiction in YA Lit. Historical Fiction authors go through a great deal of research in order to present their readers with an accurate window into history.  The final product presented to teen readers is often a masterful […]

Review: ‘Batman & Robin Crime Scene Investigations’

This set of four hardcover storybooks makes up a new series in which the famous caped crimefighters use forensic investigation techniques to solve crimes. It’s a clever way to encourage scientific thinking and understanding the real-life background behind superhero adventures. The Felon’s Fowl Flames: Batman & Robin Use Fire Investigation to Crack the Case The […]

Post-it Note Reviews of Elementary and Middle Grade Books

Now that I work in an elementary library, I’m reading a lot more titles for younger readers. Rather than review all of them like I usually do, I’m stealing Karen’s Post-it note review idea and sharing the titles with you that way. It’s been super interesting to me to see what the students (grades K-5) […]

Review of the Day: The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson

The Parker Inheritance By Varian Johnson Arthur A. Levine Books (an imprint of Scholastic) $16.99 ISBN: 978-0-545-94617-9 Ages 9-12 On shelves now. The other day I was asked to come up with ten children’s book equivalents to Claudia Rankine’s book Citizen (which, should anybody ask you, is not for kids). To do this, I wanted […]

YA A to Z: Friends and Troublemakers, a guest post by author Lisa Brown Roberts

Today as part of our ongoing attempt to build an index of topics in YA from A to Z, author Lisa Brown Roberts is joining us to talk about friends and troublemakers. Please share with us your favorite friendships and troublemakers in YA lit in the comments. As much as I enjoy writing YA romance, […]

Zena is watching, are you?

I hope you have as good a time watching this interview with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden as I did conducting it. Our conversation will also appear, edited, in the May/June special issue of the Horn Book Magazine, Making a Difference. Carla is one…

World Make Way: New Poems Inspired by Art from The Metropolitan Museum of Art

World Make Way: New Poems Inspired by Art from The Metropolitan Museum of Art Edited by Lee Bennett Hopkins Published by Abrams Books for Young Readers with The Metropolitan Museum of Art ISBN: 978-1-4197-2845-7 Grades 4 and Up Book Review “Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is […]

Review: ‘Ace’ and ‘Jumpa’

Ace: The Origin of Batman’s Hound and Jumpa: The Origin of Wonder Woman’s Kanga Writer: Steve Korte Artist: Art Baltazar Stone Arch Books; $4.95 (each) The latest offering from DC Comics and Capstone’s DC Super-Pets collaboration, which focuses on the adventures of the pets of DC superheroes and supervillains as designed and drawn by artist […]

Book Review: The Gender Identity Workbook for Kids: A Guide to Exploring Who You Are by Kelly Storck, Noah Grigni

When I’m reviewing books for professional publications, I stay quiet about them on social media. I’m always really excited once a review comes out to be able to talk about the book, finally! Here’s one of my most recent reviews, which originally appeared in the April 2018  School Library Journal.     The Gender Identity Workbook for […]

The State of Photographic Illustration in 2018

Maybe someday a book with primarily photographic illustrations will win the Caldecott Medal. Until that day, I’m going to annually post all the fiction picture books I see that use photography. There are plenty of nonfiction books that use photographs. What I’m sharing in this post is fiction that uses photos. Do you know of […]

Fusenews: Eat Your Heart Out, “Awful Library Books”

As a librarian I know that reading aloud to children is necessary for their growth and development. And I know that periodically new parents that happen to be writers in other fields will come to children’s books through their offspring and suddenly be overwhelmed with the importance of reading. In cases such as these they […]

Links: ‘Drama’ Among the Most Challenged Books—Again

The American Library Association released its list of the 10 most challenged books of 2017 last week, and this year, there was only one graphic novel: Raina Telgemeier’s Drama, which has become sort of a perennial. Some important takeaways from this year’s list is that more than ever, books for children and teens are being […]