May 24, 2018

The Advocate's Toolbox

The Latest Series Nonfiction | Series Made Simple Spring 2018

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Justifying or defending the purchase of a six-volume nonfiction series that will likely be taken out by students only once a year for a particular assignment can feel like a Sisyphean challenge—especially considering that hundreds of series are printed each season. Thankfully, many publishers this spring have taken lengths to ensure that their titles stand out, from partnering with beloved brands to developing related apps. Paula Willey cautions in “Wave of the Future” that if covers lure students with the promise of a successful reading experience, they “better give them a fighting chance at achieving it.”

In “The Power of Language,” Natalie Romano notes that quality translations and the availability of more nuanced topics written in Spanish are welcome shifts from years past, as they “will provide more children with the personalized reading experience they deserve.” The importance of a quality presentation cannot be understated, which Steven Engelfried also touches upon in “Assassin Bugs to Zebras.” The power of well-written, edifying text paired with carefully selected images and an overall thoughtful organization can make all the difference to curious readers.

Whether this latest issue of Series Made Simple is used to fill those few report-related gaps or to bolster a thriving, well-visited collection, I hope it offers support when it comes to meeting the needs and interests of your students.

SMS-Della-Fanell_Sig

Editor, Series Made Simple
dfarrell@mediasourceinc.com

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2018 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Della Farrell About Della Farrell

Della Farrell is an Assistant Editor at School Library Journal and Editor of Series Made Simple

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