February 21, 2018

The Advocate's Toolbox

World Read Aloud Day Adds Magic Night This Year

Every child likes to be read to, even those irritable tweens, according to the latest Scholastic Kids and Family Reading research.

Librarians, teachers, and families can put that research to the test on Thursday February 1, World Read Aloud Day. The annual event created by nonprofit organization LitWorld aims to get people around the world reading aloud to each other and sharing stories—no matter their age.

The fun and benefits of reading aloud don’t stop when children are able to read on their own. Reading to older kids can help build their vocabulary and improve comprehension. It also provides the opportunity to introduce books that might be too difficult for them to read independently or subject matter that they might otherwise not be comfortable talking about.

For World Read Aloud Day, Scholastic offers teacher resources, including top read aloud picks. Common Sense Media has their own suggestions of books to read aloud to kids ages eight to 12. Not surprisingly, one of those choices is Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. This year’s World Read Aloud Day connects to Sorcerer’s Stone, too, with a special evening addition, as Scholastic brings Harry Potter Book Night to the United States in tandem with World Read Aloud Day to capitalize on the series’ fun and to bond of readers across generations.

Harry Potter Book Night is an annual celebration of J.K. Rowling’s beloved series. It started in the United Kingdom in 2015 and is now celebrated in 39 different countries with various events connecting fans and introducing new generations to Harry, Hermione, Ron, and the rest.

This year’s theme is Fantastic Beasts. There is a free, downloadable kit, including games, worksheets, readings, and other activity suggestions for schools, libraries, and bookstores that want to participate.

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