September 17, 2017

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5 Titles To Inspire Future Artists | SLJ Spotlight

Recent art-focused titles from the likes of Allen Say, Susan Goldman Rubin, and others.

This article was published in School Library Journal's September 2017 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Conversations in the Classroom | #OwnVoices: Three Takes

Get comfortable with being uncomfortable when discussing #OwnVoices books with kids, advises this school librarian.

Scholastic Rolling Out Special Diverse Books Flyer for Holidays

Scholastic Reading Club flyers showcase diverse books in time for the holidays.

The Boy in the Black Suit

The Boy in the Black Suit, Jason Reynolds Atheneum Books for Young Readers, January 2015 Reviewed from final copy Sometimes people who are grieving can find comfort in structured routines. Matt Miller, the titular boy of The Boy in the Black Suit, doesn’t just adopt a routine; he gets a job at a local funeral […]

Putting LGBTQ Books into Kids’ Hands

School librarian Susan Polos believes that reading books about different kinds of families enables children to better understand others. So she co-founded “Shared Stories Open Minds,” an initiative in which children read and discuss LGBTQ-themed stories.

Librarians Tackle Body Shaming via “Size Acceptance in YA” Tumblr

On June 1, Faythe Arredondo, Sarah Hannah Gómez, Kelly Jensen, and Angie Manfredi, four bloggers, readers, and (mostly) librarians launched the “Size Acceptance in YA” Tumblr examining “fatness, fatphobia, body shaming, body policing, body objectification, and all other things relating to size and body acceptance in YA literature.”

Our Voices Matter: SLJ Chats with Valynne Maetani About “Ink and Ashes” | Up Close

The first winner of Lee & Low/Tu’s New Visions Award, debut author Valynne Maetani shares what inspired her to write a YA mystery/thriller with a strong Japanese American female protagonist.

This article was published in School Library Journal's May 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Celebrate Eisner Week With Diverse Graphic Novels

March 1-7 is Will Eisner Week. This week is held to “celebrate graphic novels, sequential art, free speech, and the amazing legacy of Will Eisner, one of the most innovative figures in the history of comics and graphic novels.” Check out the website for more information about how to celebrate the week, as well information […]

Upcoming Diverse Titles, Light Romance, and Magical Realism | What’s Hot in YA

As we close 2014, it’s heartening to see that the new year will be filled with novels featuring diverse teens, fanciful plotlines, and lots of romance. From Justine Larbalestier’s Razorhurst and Jennifer Niven’sAll the Bright Places to Stacy Lee’s Under the Painted Sky and Cindy Rodriguez’s , young adult fans will have lots to look forward to in 2015.

12 Blogs of 2014: DiversifYA

Choosing just three blogs to feature for our 12 Blogs of 2014 was hard. I may have sent Karen, Robin, and Heather about 15 emails constantly changing which blogs I was calling dibs on. I hope you’re adding all of the blogs we’re featuring to whatever blog reader you use and following the blogs and […]

Sherman Alexie and Jacqueline Woodson to Speak at BookCon 2015

A year after heavy criticism for only featuring white authors on panels, BookCon is teaming with the advocacy group We Need Diverse Books for two gatherings with authors of various backgrounds, including National Book Award winners Alexie and Woodson.

We Need Diverse Books Announces Publishing Internship Project

The new WNDB Publishing Internship Project will help support initiatives that give greater opportunities to individuals from diverse backgrounds who wish to begin careers in publishing.

Book review: Gracefully Grayson by Ami Polonsky

Gracefully Grayson, by Ami Polonsky, tells the story of 6th grade Grayson, a transgender girl. Raised as a boy, Grayson has never felt entirely comfortable in her own skin. She spends her class time doodling abstract princesses in the margins of her notebook, trying to keep them unrecognizable because she knows boys shouldn’t do that—and […]

We Need Diverse Books (Ballet Edition)

Diversity in YA has received a lot of attention recently, thanks to the #WeNeedDiverseBooks hashtag that’s evolved into a formal organization for activism and awareness. Brandy Colbert’s debut YA novel, Pointe was published just two weeks before the influential hashtag was born. Excellent timing because Pointe isn’t only a novel with a narrator of color; it’s a novel […]

Book review: Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero

Let’s get some things out of the way first. 1. Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero is absolutely fantastic. You need to order it for your library/bookstore/kid/friend/self. 2. The novel is a year in the life of Gabi, a Mexican American girl who lives in Southern California. It’s funny, sad, honest, raw, bold, […]

Why the Great Green Room is Green, Facing Censorship, and More from BookFest @ Bank Street

During the event at Manhattan’s Bank Street College of Education, Leonard S. Marcus, Brian Pinkney, Jason Chin, Coe Booth, Tim Federle, Matt de la Peña, and others talked about why they do what they do.

We Need Diverse Books and School Library Journal Announce Collaboration

The collaboration between We Need Diverse Books and School Library Journal will involve a variety of initiatives concerning diversity in children’s literature, including an event during the 2016 ALA Midwinter Meeting.

A Focus on Diversity and Savvy Blogging Drive KidLitCon 2014

For the first time, the Kidlitosphere Conference (KidLitCon) had a theme: “Blogging Diversity in Young Adult and Children’s Lit: What’s Next?”

Diversity Movement Gains Visibility at ALA Annual | ALA 2014

Addressing the groundswell of support for more diverse children’s literature, Lee & Low publisher Jason Low spoke at the ALA Annual Conference about where the movement is now and what still needs to happen.

Parents: Empower Kids to Tell Their Stories

Increasing diversity isn’t simply the responsibility of publishers. While they should make a conscious investment in seeking diverse voices, parents have a major role in nurturing children’s desire to tell their own stories.