November 21, 2017

The Advocate's Toolbox

Why Offer Black Storytime? | First Steps

Imagine that while interviewing for a library job you’re asked, “What would storytime specifically for African-American families look like to you?” That’s what happened to Kirby McCurtis. “I thought it was an especially interesting and challenging question,” says Kirby, who aced the interview and is now Multnomah County Library’s (MCL) newest African-American librarian. “It stayed with me even after the second interview. Now that I am working here, I have the opportunity to answer it every Saturday. It’s very exciting!”

ETots: a Public Library iPad Program for Preschoolers

Children’s services librarian Cindy Wall documents what she learned in presenting an iPad program for her youngest users —one and two year olds.

Mind Readers: Thinking Out Loud Can Raise Children’s Comprehension Skills

It’s toddler storytime: let the rumpus begin! Toddlers bound quickly into the room. One hurdles mom’s legs while waiting for the opening song. Some hop, others roam, and a few practically climb our unflappable colleague Janie. Even after getting most of their wiggles out, many toddlers continue to float around the room—until Janie begins to read one of her favorite books, Owl Babies (Candlewick, 1996) by Martin Waddell.