November 18, 2017

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Eight Librarians Flip Their Skills To Serve a New Calling

These powerhouse librarians leveraged their experience to shift careers midstream, after decades on the job, or post-“retirement.” They’re still giving to the profession.

This article was published in School Library Journal's January 2017 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

It’s Genius Hour!

Understanding genius hour and making it rock at your school.

This article was published in School Library Journal's October 2016 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

In the Tech Mosh Pit: True Adventures of Nikki Robertson

Nikki Robertson enjoys a sandbox just as much as her students. But instead of shovels and sifters, her toys tend toward digital tools that fill the maker space at James Clemens High School in Madison, AL, where Robertson is the librarian and tech facilitator. Her goal? Get messy, get out of her comfort zone, and bring others along with her.

This article was published in School Library Journal's November 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Pictures of the Week | Librarians Tat Up

“Library Journal” Movers & Shakers and “Dr. Who” fans Matthew Winner and Sherry Gick show commitment to their profession with freshly inked tattoos that say “Mover and Shaker” in Gallifreyean.

I Tried, I ‘Liked,’ I Shared: How Travis Jonker handles social media

If there’s one thing you can say about all school librarians: we’re cat people. The other is: we like trying things. And when it comes to social media, I’ve tried it all.

This article was published in School Library Journal's October 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

With “GeniusCon” Project, Students Connect and Problem Solve

If you could change one thing about your school, what would it be, and how would you do it? Teacher librarians Sherry Gick and Matthew Winner are asking students this very question with a collaborative, student-driven initiative they’re calling GeniusCon.