November 17, 2017

Subscribe to SLJ

Self-Censorship, More | Feedback

Many readers responded to our coverage of Banned Books Week. No self-censorship here!

This article was published in School Library Journal's November 2016 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

SLJ Controversial Book Survey: Data and Findings

Download SLJ’s 2016 Controversial Books Survey report, exploring self-censorship among school librarians.

SLJ Controversial Books Survey Responses: Weighing Subject Matter

SLJ’s 2016 Controversial Books Survey, addressing self-censorship, asked school librarians: “When making purchasing decisions, do find yourself weighing the effect of controversial subject matter more often now than you did one or two years ago?” Here’s what respondents who answered “yes” had to say.

SLJ Controversial Books Survey: Comments About Book Challenges

In SLJ’s 2016 Controversial Books Survey, we asked school librarians to tell us about a book challenge they had personally experienced or to communicate other information about this topic.
Here’s what they said.

D.I.Y. Censorship: An Infographic

Download this visual representation of key findings in SLJ’s 2016 Controversial Books Survey of school librarians, exploring self-censorship.

SLJ Controversial Book Survey: Comments About Age-Appropriateness

SLJ’s 2016 Controversial Books survey asked school librarians how they determined if a book is age-appropriate. Here’s what they said.

SLJ Controversial Books Survey: Word Clouds

School librarians mentioned these terms the most in their their answers to two questions in SLJ’s 2016 survey, which explores self-censorship.

Unnatural Selection: More Librarians Are Self-Censoring

Restricting books with controversial content is on the rise in school libraries, according to SLJ’s 2016 Controversial Books Survey, which explores self-censorship.

This article was published in School Library Journal's October 2016 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Assessing Controversial Books | Scales on Censorship

Should libraries that already purchased books based on their starred reviews keep or withdraw them because of subsequent controversies?

This article was published in School Library Journal's February 2016 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

You Don’t Show the Sweet Without the Bitter | Up for Debate

I understand small moments of joy on a page, like a slave receiving a Christmas present, because I can place those stories into a broad landscape and see them as the exception, not the norm. You have to earn hopeful stories about horrifying events, and you can only see what hope means if the horrors lurking nearby are visible

We Will Continue to Raise Our Voices: Survival, Slavery, Censorship | Up for Debate

This ‘shocking and unprecedented case of self-censorship’ was, in fact, an editorial decision. The publishing industry makes thousands of them every day. They happen in response to many factors, including outside pressure, personal bias, and money. This decision happened after many voices were raised opposing the book, led by Black Lives Matter activist Leslie Mac.

So People Disagree. Is This a Problem? | Up for Debate

Withdrawing a book from circulation—which makes it disappear as effectively as burning—is a dangerous course. The book is gone. By the same logic, other books will also disappear, or never be written. But there’s another compelling cause for concern: Censorship often works against those who are the most marginalized—historically, women, minorities, and dissidents.

SLJ Self-Censorship Survey

By Debra Lau Whelan

To gain a better understanding of collection development and the issue of self-censorship, School Library Journal recently conducted an anonymous survey, which was emailed to 5,438 of SLJ‘s Extra Helping subscribers on November 18, 2008. The survey closed on December 2, 2008.

The results are based on 654 school libraries responding, and they are broken down as follows: 53 percent elementary school librarians, 37 percent middle school librarians, 30 percent of high school librarians, and 5 percent other. […]