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April 25, 2014

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Where the Dystopian Craze meets Literary Fiction

Where the Dystopian Craze meets Literary Fiction

Adult Books for Teens examines the latest by Chang-Rae Lee: On Such a Full Sea.

YALSA GGNT Top Ten Manga: Knights of Sidonia Volume 1-2

YALSA GGNT Top Ten Manga: Knights of Sidonia Volume 1-2

Ten centuries have passed since the Earth and its solar system was destroyed by the Gauna, a massive, nearly indestructible, yet barely sentient life form. Mankind escaped out into space, in massive seed ships that carry the remnants of humanity who search for a new planet to call home, without the threat of the Gauna [...]

The Martian

The Martian

I feel like we’re in the middle of a 6-part series on science fiction here on AB4T, but there really was no intention behind it. These are the books and reviews in front of us! Today I present The Martian. I think Andy Weir and Crown Books must have the luck of the Gods. Thanks to [...]

On the Run

On the Run

Last week I observed that it’s been quite a winter for science fiction, and today we share two more SF recommendations. Both feature an alternate history aspect and siblings on the run. In Daniel Price’s The Flight of the Silvers, six people watch as our world is destroyed before being whisked away to an alternate America. [...]

Annihilation

Annihilation

Last week I praised Julianna Baggott for publishing her science fiction Pure trilogy within 2 years. Then on Monday, we posted our review of  MD Waters’s Archetype, which has a sequel due out in July. Well, Jeff VanderMeer has got them both beat–if the scheduling works as planned, the entirety of his new SF trilogy, [...]

Archetype

Archetype

This is a great season for adult science fiction with teen appeal. Some years we barely see any. This year we have 3 outstanding titles already (Red Rising, Burn, and now Archetype) with three more reviews coming soon. I started Archetype thinking I was reading it just for fun. I didn’t “assign it” to myself [...]

Review of the Day: Space Mountain by Bryan Q. Miller

Review of the Day: Space Mountain by Bryan Q. Miller

Space Mountain: A Graphic Novel By Bryan Q. Miller Pencils and Inks by Kelley Jones Letters by Rob Leigh Colors by Brian & Kristy Miller Disney Press (an imprint of Disney Book Group) $12.99 ISBN: 978-1423162292 Ages 9-12 On shelves May 6th It sounds at first like a bit of a joke. You take a [...]

Victorian Violence

Hyde

Robert Louis Stevenson published The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in 1886, and the next year Arthur Conan Doyle published A Study in Scarlet, the first novel to feature Sherlock Holmes–both works set in the heart of London. And in September of 1888, the serial killer known as Jack the Ripper began [...]

Red Rising

Red Rising

Red Rising by Pierce Brown is the powerful first in a projected dystopian trilogy. This debut lives up to the hype that surrounds, and I don’t use the word “powerful” lightly. The writing is muscular and vivid. The characters come alive. The plot is intense and perfectly paced. This is a great choice for readers who loved Hunger Games (or [...]

The Summer Prince, a Printz Indeed (says I)

The Summer Prince, a Printz Indeed (says I)

The Summer Prince, Alaya Dawn Johnson Arthur A. Levine (Scholastic), March 2013 Reviewed from ARC and finished ebook I’ve already gone on record saying that this is my personal frontrunner this year. It’s the book, above all other books, that worked for me as a reader and that I can support as a critic. If [...]

Two New Series

Two New Series

Today we celebrate the launch of two new series. First, an epic fantasy by David Hair, up to now a YA author with two previous series under his belt. With Mage’s Blood he steps into the adult realm. Our reviewer (and an extended post on the Tor blog by Niall Alexander) places the Moontide Quartet squarely in the [...]

Review: Obsidian Mirror

Review: Obsidian Mirror

Obsidian Mirror by Catherine Fisher. Dial Books for Younger Readers, a member of Penguin Group. 2013. Library copy. The Plot: Time travel with a magical mirror. You want more? There are also the Shee. You know, the cold blooded not-human beings of legend who steal human children and never really age. You want more? A [...]

Review: Tandem

Review: Tandem

Tandem: The Many Worlds Trilogy, Book I by Anna Jarzab. Delacorte Press, an imprint of Random House. 2013. Reviewed from ARC. The Plot: Sasha Lawson is an ordinary teenager. She lives with her grandfather; is a good girl; has friends. Princess Juliana is rich and privileged, and facing an arranged marriage for the good of her [...]

I only just got why he’s called ENDER

I only just got why he’s called ENDER

I saw Ender’s Game last weekend and enjoyed it more than I thought I would. What impressed me most was how much a true children’s movie it is; like Asa Butterfield’s (Ender) previous movie Hugo, Ender’s Game neither winks over children’s heads to an adult audience nor sexes things up for putative YA interest. Although […]

The post I only just got why he’s called ENDER appeared first on The Horn Book.

The Different Girl

The Different Girl, Gordon Dahlquist Dutton Children’s, Feb 2013 Reviewed from ARC Let’s talk about voice (bay-bee), because this book features one of the strongest I’ve come across. (And before you hit the jump, please remember that we do spoilers here. All the time. So if you are reading on and you haven’t read the [...]

Speculative Fiction

Speculative Fiction

Baba Yaga is a witch of Russian folklore, and Toby Barlow bewitches with his new novel — our starred reviewof the day. His first, Sharp Teeth, was a 2009 Alex Award winner, a story of werewolves in L.A. told entirely in verse. Babayaga is (mostly) straight prose, and offers quite a combination of genres–spy thriller, [...]

Popularity Contest: 2013 Hugo Awards Crown SF Winners

Infinity Ring- Curse of the Ancients

The arrival of fall marks the start of the literary awards season. Already Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami is being touted as an odds-on favorite to win the Nobel Prize for Literature next month. But the cynic in me guesses that the always inscrutable Swedish committee of judges will bypass the best-selling author of 1Q84, Kafka [...]

Is ‘Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox’ the Darkest Superhero Film Ever?

Is ‘Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox’ the Darkest Superhero Film Ever?

Can creators in essence separate the “super” from the “hero” and still be said to be working with the same character?

Weekly Reviews: Monster Thrillers

Benjamin Percy’s Red Moon is a political thriller as much as werewolf horror novel, in the same way that World War Z is about military strategy. Red Moon reflects the current state of our world, in particular terrorism, persecuted minorities, and the importance of energy sources in today’s political decision-making. In fact, Justin Cronin (author of The [...]

Review: Fuse

Fuse: Book 2 of the Pure Trilogy by Julianna Baggott. Grand Central Publishing, a division of Hachette Book Group. 2013. Review copy from conference. Sequel to Pure. Part of my “vacation reads,” books for adults to read during their vacation — hey, it’s summer vacation! Also, this is a sequel to an Alex Award winner; [...]