September 24, 2017

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Sunday Reflections: Talking with Teens about Charlottesville

Yesterday I spent a lot of time talking with The Teen about the events that happened in Charlottesville. We listened to a lot of NPR and talked about what we heard. We talked about what we didn’t hear in our church (in the sermon, although the situation was mentioned, our pastor did not explicitly come […]

Book Review: It’s Not Like It’s a Secret by Misa Sugiura

Publisher’s description This charming and bittersweet coming-of-age story featuring two girls of color falling in love is part To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before and part Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda. Sixteen-year-old Sana Kiyohara has too many secrets. Some are small, like how it bothers her when her friends don’t invite her to […]

Book Review: Armstrong and Charlie by Steven B. Frank

Publisher’s description Charlie isn’t looking forward to sixth grade. If he starts sixth grade, chances are he’ll finish it. And when he does, he’ll grow older than the brother he recently lost. Armstrong isn’t looking forward to sixth grade, either. When his parents sign him up for Opportunity Busing to a white school in the […]

Book Review: Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham

Publisher’s description Some bodies won’t stay buried. Some stories need to be told. When seventeen-year-old Rowan Chase finds a skeleton on her family’s property, she has no idea that investigating the brutal century-old murder will lead to a summer of painful discoveries about the past… and the present. Nearly one hundred years earlier, a misguided […]

Making the Personal Political | Angie Thomas on “The Hate U Give”

Angie Thomas, debut novelist of The Hate U Give, a stirring work on police brutality and racial violence, spoke with SLJ about bigotry, the influence of real life on her book, and the power of literature.

From Refugees to Voting Rights, Books to Inspire a Just, Inclusive Society

Dozens of titles that help promote a deeper understanding and acceptance of our human differences, selected and recommended by the Bank Street College of Education.

Behind the Poster: Artist Calef Brown Talks with SLJ

SLJ chatted with the Lee Bennett Hopkins honor award winner about what led him to the creation of the striking poster included in our February 2017 issue.

Book Review: Racial Profiling: Everyday Inequality by Alison Marie Behnke

Publisher’s description In the United States, racial profiling affects thousands of Americans every day. Both individuals and institutions—such as law enforcement agencies, government bodies, and schools—routinely use race or ethnicity as grounds for suspecting someone of an offense. The high-profile deaths of unarmed people of color at the hands of police officers have brought renewed […]

Book Review: The March Against Fear: The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power by Ann Bausum

Publisher’s description James Meredith’s 1966 march in Mississippi began as one man’s peaceful protest for voter registration and became one of the South’s most important demonstrations of the civil rights movement. It brought together leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and Stokely Carmichael, who formed an unlikely alliance that resulted in the Black Power movement, […]

Book Review: The Truth of Right Now by Kara Lee Corthron

Publisher’s description Two isolated teens struggle against their complicated lives to find a true connection in this heartwrenching debut novel about first love and the wreckage of growing up. Lily is returning to her privileged Manhattan high school after a harrowing end to her sophomore year and it’s not pretty. She hates chemistry and her […]

Hate Incidents in Libraries Spark a Renewed Commitment to Serve All

Librarians across the country stand up to swastikas, hate speech, and more post-election.

Sunday Reflections: How the 2016 Election is Affecting Teens, Week 3 (A tweet story by Mary Hinson)

On Sundays, I have the privilege of hosting a weekly event that we call Spaghetti Sunday (inspired by author Christa Desir). We open our home to a wide group of people, eat food (not always spaghetti), do puzzles, play games, and just hang out. My beloved Mary Hinson (@knoxdiver on Twitter, YA assistant at Irving […]

Things I Never Learned in Library School: On Being a Teen Librarian 2 Weeks After the Election of Donald Trump

I knew eventually something like this would happen, I just didn’t think it would be so soon. The call came on Friday. A co-worker, her nephew took his own life. He was both black and gay and he saw the writing on the wall and he was scared. He read the news, he heard the […]

Book Review: Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Perez

Publisher’s description: “This is East Texas, and there’s lines. Lines you cross, lines you don’t cross. That clear?” New London, Texas. 1937. Naomi Smith and Wash Fullerton know about the lines in East Texas as well as anyone. They know the signs that mark them. They know the people who enforce them. But there are […]

Not Enough: We Must Renew the Charge to Build an Equitable World | Editorial

Libraries have long been central to helping create a culture that, at a minimum, tolerates difference and, at best, embraces and celebrates it. Yet, we must do more to desegregate our schools, our neighborhoods, and our workplaces—including our libraries.

This article was published in School Library Journal's July 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Book Review: Joyride by Anna Banks

In Joyride, by Anna Banks, Carly and Arden find themselves falling for each other, against all odds. 16-year-old Carly Vega works the graveyard shift at a local gas station. She turns over all of her earnings to her older brother, Julio, as they work hard to pull together enough money to smuggle their parents and […]

The Big Screen’s ‘Dear White People’ and a Roundup of Not-to-Miss YA Novels

Dear White People, written and directed by Justin Simien, takes a satirical look at race relations in America. Be prepared for the October 17 premiere with a selection of books for teens that deal with intolerance, civil rights, and racism.

Pick of the Day: The Freedom Maze (Audiobook)

The Freedom Maze. By Delia Sherman. 8 CDs. 8:19 hrs. Prod. by Listening Library. Dist. by Listening Library/Books on Tape. 2012. ISBN 978-0-499-01463-9. $55.
Gr 5-8–Sophie’s mother drops her off to spend the summer at her grandmother’s house in the Louisiana Bayou. Once a prolific sugar plantation, the property is derelict and overgrown. In the garden, Sophie discovers a maze, now in ruins, much like Sophie’s life since her parents’ divorce. It’s 1960, and the stigma of the divorce, combined with […]