November 21, 2017

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Teens Tackle Race and Identity, Aided by a Graphic Novel | SLJ Summit 2017

Move over, John Green. In an event featuring star authors, a group of Oregon high school students stole the show at SLJ’s 2017 Summit. Here’s video of the teen panel.

Emily Jenkins Apologizes for “A Fine Dessert”

Describing her book as “racially insensitive,” author Emily Jenkins took to the web Sunday to apologize for her picture book A Fine Dessert, announcing her intent to donate her writing fee to We Need Diverse Books, which has been confirmed by the organization.

Book Review: See No Color by Shannon Gibney

Publisher’s description: Despite some teasing, being a biracial girl adopted by a white family didn’t used to bother Alex much. She was a stellar baseball player, just like her father—her baseball coach and a former pro athlete. All Alex wanted was to play ball forever. But after she meets Reggie, the first black guy who’s […]

Book Review: Breakaway by Kat Spears

Publisher’s description: When Jason Marshall’s younger sister passes away, he knows he can count on his three best friends and soccer teammates–Mario, Jordie, and Chick–to be there for him. With a grief-crippled mother and a father who’s not in the picture, he needs them more than ever. But when Mario starts hanging out with a […]

Drugged by Love?

Love Is the Drug, Alaya Dawn Johnson Arthur A. Levine/Scholastic, September 2014 Reviewed from ARC So, I think I made it pretty clear last year that I really like Alaya Dawn Johnson’s style. She’s smart and she writes books that appeal to me as a reader. But if you dismiss this as just another fangirl […]

Video: “Do You Write About Race?” | SLJ Day of Dialog 2014

Authors address the topic of the day in this 12-minute clip from the “Diversity in Middle Grade Fiction” panel at School Library Journal’s Day of Dialog, held in New York on May 28, 2014.

How Cross-Racial Scenes in Picture Books Build Acceptance

A study by author Krista Maywalt Aronson revealed that children who looked at picture books portraying children from different races together reported more interest in playing across difference.

We Need Diverse Books . . . But Are We Willing to Discuss Them With Our Kids?

“If we want parents to have serious discussions about race with their four and five and six-year-olds then we need to have books that help to do this,” writes Betsy Bird on her blog A Fuse #8 Production. “A Picture Book Reading List for Discussing Race, Religion, and Alternative Lifestyles with the Young” is included.