August 26, 2016

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“Where was the editor?”

This week’s Horn Book podcast is devoted to–well, if you can ever say the podcast is devoted to one thing in particular beyond Siân and me yammering for half an hour–Lane Smith’s new book There Is a Tribe of Kids. At one point I opine that the publisher knew or should have known, anyway, about the […]

Smore’s New Educator Hive

Many of us rely on Smore for student projects, for our flyers, announcements to parents, instruction and more.  Many of us love it for its super-low, truly accessible learning curve. This week, the folks at Smore introduced The Educator Hive.  The Hive currently features more than 450 flyer and newsletter templates shared by other educators […]

A bumpy ride

I had been content to let Calling Caldecott’s enlightening discussion about A Fine Dessert speak for itself, and the subsequent publication of A Birthday Cake for George Washington a year later was more than anything a spectacular example of bad timing–by the time A Fine Dessert was gathering outrage, A Birthday Cake was well on its […]

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That clinking clanking sound

With the (incoming, anyway) scandal at this weekend’s ALA conference being a question about the not-always-bright line between editorial independence and advertisers’ interests, I thought I would remind you of the Horn Book’s position on the relationship between those two things. Otherwise, I hope I see some of you this weekend: the Horn Book can […]

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Lynne Reid Banks: right for the wrong reasons

I think we’ve all written letters like this one. Responding to the announcement that David Almond’s A Song for Ella Grey had won the Guardian Children’s Fiction Award, author Lynne Reid Banks wrote to that publication: “Buoyed up by David Almond’s beautiful description (21 November) of his inspiration for writing A Song for Ella Grey, which  has […]

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and clunk clunk clunk went the folktale market

Betsy Bird at Fuse #8 is rightfully mourning the relative dearth of African folktale publishing and simultaneously celebrating one of its legends from the glory days, Verna Aardema. All I can say is God bless Verna Aardema, who knew just how to write a picture-book text that would bring any library story hour to life. […]

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Down, girl, down!

Even in my day having been one of Betsy Bird‘s Hot Men of Children’s Literature (BB: are those archived anywhere?) I was more than a little skeeved out by Meaghan O’Connell’s “The Children’s-Book Guy: An Ideal Crush Object,” published yesterday in New York Magazine but reading like something written by Carrie Bradshaw in 1999: “If you think […]

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Threesomes?

“You just follow your heart when it comes to fingering scenes” was MY takeaway quote from the latest newspaper report on the steamy goings-on in YA fiction, which predictably, has people a-Twitter. But while the article is sensationalized, it isn’t incorrect. Young adult fiction is sexier than it used to be, even if the “threesomes” […]

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Can’t buy me love

The Gawker debacle has been very entertaining. I read and respect the site too much to enjoy the clusterfuck in a schadenfreudey kind of way, but I am enjoying the intellectual stimulation provided by the whole host of journalism questions set bristling. What’s a public figure? Was the subject in question a public figure, or a behind-the-scenes media […]

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Oneworld to Launch U.S. YA Imprint in July

Rock-the-Boat logo

The UK publisher Oneworld Publications will officially launch its young adult and children’s imprint, Rock the Boat, on June 2 in the UK and July 14 in the United States. The publisher’s first U.S. title, written for a middle school audience, is Minus Me by Norwegian bestselling YA author Ingelin Røssland.