October 18, 2017

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Answering the Call: Meg Rosoff on Finishing Mal Peet’s “Beck”

The award-winning author talks to SLJ about what is perhaps the biggest and most challenging project of her career: completing a novel begun by Mal Peet.

Interview: John Corey Whaley on Star Trek, Anxiety, and “Highly Illogical Behavior”

SLJ chats with Printz Award-winner John Corey Whaley about his third YA novel Highly Illogical Behavior

Jolts of Thoughts on the Recent Spate of Awards

I’ve been privy to lots of interesting conversations about our most recent ALA winners this week.  And since it’s Friday and we’re all now able to step back and take into account what all just happened, here is a quick summary of some of the discussions, topics, and random facts surrounding the Youth Media Awards […]

SLJ Welcomes Back “Someday” Printz Blog

Celebrating its fifth year, SLJ’s “Someday My Printz Will Come” blog has returned. It will continue to speculate about possible contenders for YALSA’s Michael L. Printz Award while even adding a few podcast episodes liven up the discussion.

Printz Contenders Written by Fan Favorites │JLG’s On the Radar Teen

Here’s a short list of fan favorites that just might be considered for the Micheal L. Printz Award for Excellence for Young Adult Literature. Watch for the announcement of the winner at the ALA Midwinter Youth Media Awards.

Printz and the Power of Story: Honorees Get Personal at Awards Reception | ALA 2013

For many young adult literature aficionados, the highlight of the American Library Association’s annual summer conference is the ticketed reception for the Printz Awards. A central theme emerged at this year’s celebration: the power of storytelling and its ability to connect kids to larger truths about the world.

Looking for Light: ‘In Darkness’ author Lake talks to SLJ

It took many by surprise when Nick Lake’s ambitious young adult novel In Darkness (Bloomsbury) was named for the Printz Award at last month’s Youth Media Awards. Although filled with vivid details of oppression, poverty, and violence, Lake sees the book as a hopeful one with an important message for its teen readers, “this idea of darkness being only a temporary thing,” he tells SLJ.