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May 27, 2015

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Hack Your Notebook: Circuitry mixes with paper in a creative project for 21st century learners

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What if we could reappropriate traditional paper pads to teach technology and foster creativity? It might look something like “Hack Your Notebook,” a project that adds illumination—literally—to what you write or draw with a craft called paper circuitry.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Connected Learning | Professional Shelf

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A collection of 18 inspiring, real-life stories gleaned from the National Writing Project’s “Digital Is” website highlights the work of teachers actively shaping classroom instruction to meet the needs of diverse student populations amid the challenges of new standards and high-stakes testing.

Maker Summer: A Global Project Offers DIY Opportunities

Maker Summer: A global project offers DIY opportunities for creativity and sharing

Tinkerers of all ages are flexing their creative muscles during the Summer of Making and Connecting, a global project geared to empower digital crafters and match people with maker activities, online or on the street.

California 10th Graders Improve Their Writing Skills—Through an Interactive Fiction Game

California 10th Graders Improve Their Writing Skills—Through an Interaction Fiction Game

“You hear a lot about gaming and engaging kids in STEM subjects, says teacher Jason Sellers. “So, I wondered, what does gaming look like in English?” Sellers, a teacher at the French American International School in San Francisco, found out, basing a classroom lesson in Playfic, an online community where users write, share, and play games using Inform 7, a programming system for creating interactive fiction based on natural language.

Digital Research Technologies Offer More Information, More Distraction for High School Students, According to Pew Report

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Though a recent report by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project has found that in general, digital research tools impact students’ work positively, the study also reported that teachers believe that access to technology is also making students much more easily distracted.