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May 23, 2015

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3-D Printing: Worth the Hype? | The Maker Issue

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What is 3-D printing exactly, and how does it serve kids? Here’s a walk-through.

This article was published in School Library Journal's May 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Scholastic Sells Ed Tech Business to Focus on Publishing

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Scholastic announced on April 24 that it will sell its education technology and services division to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for $575 million to focus on its thriving publishing business.

MinecraftEdu Takes Hold in Schools

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With myriad adaptations for use in the classroom, MinecraftEdu brings Common Core–enhanced gaming to students.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

SLJ Reviews the Taz 4 3-D Printer | Test Drive

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Chad Sansing considers the Lulzbot device, resembling a “steampunk erector set,” and 3-D printing’s learning potential.

This article was published in School Library Journal's December 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

National Library Lock-in Event Features Authors, Games, and Minecraft

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The National Teen Library Lock-in grew out of an event coordinated by Jennifer Lawson from San Diego County Library in 2011 and has become a popular celebration that connects teens and librarians across the country. Youth services librarian Claudia Haines shares how the addition ofMinecraft set this year’s celebration apart.

Sonoma Library to Host Minecraft Camp

Sonoma Library to Host Minecraft Camp

Rebecca Forth doesn’t want kids to simply play Minecraft, she wants them to design their own worlds in the virtual building game. They can do just that and learn the necessary coding skills in a program set to launch at the Healdsburg branch of the Sonoma County (CA) Library in March 2014.

A Minecraft Library Scores Big: Mattituck, NY, Branch Is a Hit with Kids

A Minecraft Library Scores Big: Mattituck, NY, Branch Is a Hit with Kids

Inspired by the experiences of Connecticut librarian Sarah Ludwig’s Minecraft library club, Elizabeth Grohoski and Karen Letteriello of the Mattituck-Laurel Library (NY) are now using a virtual Minecraft library to attract young patrons. The game allows users to build in a 3-D virtual world with cubes similar to Legos—but without any proscriptive kits and manuals.

This article was published in School Library Journal's September 2013 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Minecraft Club: Want to bring the hottest game into your classroom or library? Here’s how.

Minecraft Club: Want to bring the hottest game into your classroom or library? Here’s how.

The popular game Minecraft “is accessible, fun, and, ultimately, an excellent learning tool for both nerds and non-nerds,” says Sarah Ludwig, who takes us step by step through her process of creating a thriving Minecraft club in her library. New to Minecraft? There’s a video primer.

Libraries, Ebooks and Beyond: Library “Makers” Share How It’s Done

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Searching for some great ways to get kids hooked on creating digital content? Attendees at the October 17 Digital Shift event got some great tips from Wes Fryer, Melissa Techman, Liz Castro and Erin Daly, all participants in a panel on “Makers in the Library.”

How Minecraft Mixes with Fiction

Mixing Minecraft with Fiction

Andrea Buchanan’s young adult novel Gift was the first to incorporate Minecraft. What’s that you say? The creative game, in which users build stuff out of cubes within a 3-D environment, deserves a closer look. YA librarian Erin Daly offers an expert’s view of the Minecraft element in Gift and how well the sandbox game worked as an element within a novel.

Minecraft in the Classroom and Library

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Minecraft 101, with resources for getting a program started in your school or library.

Explore, Create, Survive: ‘Minecraft’ is a versatile and fun game with broad appeal

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“Can you teleport me?” “How do I fly?” “I need a sword.” “What are you building?” These eclectic exclamations are the sounds of a room full of teens playing Minecraft (www.minecraft.net). We play every other Wednesday in Chicopee (MA) Public Library’s computer lab, often filling all ten computers, and are occasionally joined by teens playing from home. They play freely, building whatever suits their fancies. As I’ve watched these teens discover skills in the game, I’ve been thinking about Minecraft’s potential for both structured and unstructured activities.