November 18, 2017

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Family Matters | SLJ Spotlight

From struggling to find footing as a foster kid to having a mom with depression, these YA titles are about working through real-life situations.

Can Lightning Strike Twice?

Previous winners, new books… Sometimes it means the magic has happened again, and a lucky (well, and talented) author will receive a second (or third) golden P sticker. More often, the magic doesn’t happen again, but previous winners have a proven track record so it’s a pretty sure bet anything from a previous winner received […]

Marilyn Nelson’s “My Seneca Village” | A Lesson Plan and Discussion Guide

In a series of stunning poems, Newbery and Coretta Scott King awards honoree Marilyn Nelson introduces readers to My Seneca Village, a multiethnic 19th-century community that thrived on the edge of what today is New York City’s Central Park

Our 2015 Predictions and Picks: Loves and Likelies

One of the greatest joys of writing this blog is the chance to be spectacularly wrong* come the announcements. So here is our official post of both our personal picks — books we can support and love love love — and our predictions, which are the books we think are most likely — even if […]

Pyrite Redux: Worlds in Flux

Our final three redux books are three of my own top books this year. They vary in length, in genre, in style, and more — indeed, in many ways I can’t imagine three more distinct titles. And yet, they have something essential in common (other than my appreciation, that is): all three are about moments […]

How I Discovered Poetry

How I Discovered Poetry, Marilyn Nelson, illustrated by Hadley Hooper Dial Books, January 2014 Reviewed from final copy Marilyn Nelson, author of the 2006 Printz honor book A Wreath for Emmett Till, is responsible for what may be this year’s most unique contender, pairing two genres only occasionally spotted in the YA world — memoir […]

Through a Child’s Eyes | A Conversation with Marilyn Nelson

In unrhymed sonnets, the acclaimed poet Marilyn Nelson traces her early years from age four to 14, describing her family’s many moves, her growing self-awareness, and her awakening as a poet.