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October 22, 2014

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Newsreel heaven! British Pathé posts 90,000 Historical Films on YouTube

Newsreel heaven! British Pathé post 90,000 Historical Films on YouTube

British Pathé has placed its archive of more than 90,000 historical films (or 3,500 hours) on YouTube.

New Angles on Nonfiction | Editorial Series Made Simple

Dar-Mahnaz_web

Spicing up the same old subjects can be hard, but these series make for some great new options—your readers will be informed, entertained, and, perhaps best of all, intrigued. Read on!

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

History Everywhere: World History | Series Made Simple

SMS1404_World2

The topics covered in these geographically diverse books range from the ancient to the nearly contemporary. As kids read the best of this group, they will not only learn about historical cultures and events, but also be inspired to better know and understand the past.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

2013: a round-up of wrap-ups

2013: a round-up of wrap-ups

When we return to a new year in school and approach the customary looking back and thinking forward rituals, here are a few models that might inspire reflection and creativity. Google’s #Zeitgeist2013 shares trends relating to the stuff we searched.  You may also explore the Zeitgeists by categories.  Use the pull-down menu to shift to [...]

Interview: Nathan Hale on The Donner Dinner Party

Donner Dinner Party

Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales books are a cheeky take on American history, but they are also sophisticated graphic storytelling that help bring the events to life in ways that simple prose could not. His latest book, The Donner Dinner Party, takes on a subject that has horrified and fascinated the public since it happened and [...]

In Honor of Baseball’s All-Star Game, A Book to Pre-Order

Student sports fans (in this case, baseball fans specifically) can leverage their outside-of-school literacies to comprehend and appreciate the sophisticated cartoons and high-level text.

Now in Theaters: An Absolutely Must-See Doc About Digital Literacy

Now in Theaters: An Absolutely Must-See Doc About Digital Literacy

Filmmaker Cullen Hoback’s work represents a treasure trove of ideas for those who want to connect domestic spying and the death of privacy to civics, media studies, ICT, and political theory—not to mention information literacy and digital literacy specifically.

Syria, Spain, and the Eternal Present | Consider the Source

Photographers Gerda Taro and Robert Capa

A teen asks, “Why should we care about history, anyway? It’s over.” Marc Aronson replies.

Review: The Plantagenets

The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England by Dan Jones. Viking. 2013. Reviewed from ARC from publisher. Vacation reads (aka, when I talk about books for grownups and post them before holidays.) It’s About: The designated heir of England dies in a shipwreck; England is plunged into civil war as descendants of [...]

Review: Mankind: The Story of All of Us

Mankind: The Story of All of Us is an ambitious 12-part TV series that looks at all of human civilization, starting from the beginnings of agriculture to the discovery of America. This graphic novel is a supplement to the program and features seven short stories covering from prehistoric times to the Crusades. It touches on [...]

The Shoah Foundation on Media Literacy… and the Importance of Librarians

“It was purposeful that the IWitness platform was built with media literacy and school standards around digital education right at the center of its architecture.”

Women’s History Month

It’s Women’s History Month and thus the Kidlit Celebrates Women’s History Month blog is back. I’ll be over there later this month to write about our beloved Bertha; but go over there now to see accounts of the likes of Emily Brontë, Julia Morgan, and Temple Grandin. On a related note, I’ve been enjoying my [...]

The post Women’s History Month appeared first on The Horn Book.

Blu-ray/DVD/Digital Copy Giveaway: 20th Anniversary Edition of SCHINDLER’S LIST

Schindler’s List is a film that really doesn’t need much of an introduction from me. If you’ve seen it, you’ve seen it. If you haven’t, you probably should. Perhaps more than any other piece of moving-image media it has contributed to the “media construction” of the Holocaust for contemporary audiences, taking its place alongside Night [...]

The Oscars: Frank Baker Talks Critical Thinking, Movie Fandom, and the Common Core

The Oscars: Frank Baker Talks Critical Thinking, Movie Fandom, and the Common Core

“Yes: I think it is fair, appropriate and altogether fitting that we share our passion for media. I think a great question to ask anyone and to demand an answer to is: why are you a fan of __(fill in the blank)_?”

Black History Month Giveaway: ‘King: A Filmed Record… Montgomery to Memphis’

Ely Landau’s King: A Filmed Record received an Oscar nomination for Best Documentary more than forty years ago, and strangely enough you could see that scenario repeating if it were released today—it’s that riveting, that smart, that important. (And actually this Sunday, it is being “released” again for a single day at select theaters.) Just [...]

Resources for Black History Month

I’ve been gathering a few Black History Month resources to share with teachers here at our high school and thought I’d share them here as well. African American History Month, a collaborative government-sponsored site, provides links to primary source-driven lessons from the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the National Gallery, the National Park Service [...]

UN History Project launched

Earlier this month, Harvard University’s Department of History announced the launch of the United Nations History Project.
Supported by the United Nations Foundation, in cooperation with the Harvard Asia Center and the Joint Center for History and Economics, the site aggregates a wealth of materials for researching and teaching the history of the United Nations and [...]

The Known and the Uncertain: The Special Challenge of Teaching Students to Think Like a Historian or Scientist

Girl with glasses and E=mc2

One of the joys of reading the Times Literary Supplement (TLS), the British book review journal that arrives in my mailbox more or less on schedule four times a month, is that it periodically includes lengthy essays drawn from lectures or from introductions to new books that are aimed at that borderline place between the educated layperson and the browsing academic. TLS’s editors often group a selection of each week’s works by theme, and its July 6 issue included several interesting reviews related to medieval heresy. One sentence in the piece stopped me in my tracks: “he” (I’ll tell you whom in a moment) “frames what he is not sure of within the boundaries of what he is sure about.”