May 20, 2017

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Technology, Pure and Simple: General Science | Series Nonfiction

Black holes, drones, and prehistoric beasts…oh my! A wondrous exploration of STEM fields awaits.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2017 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Seriously STEM | Spectacular Visual Guides for the Classroom and Library

Stunning photography, 3-D illustrations, and learner-friendly formatting distinguish a crop of new and updated science compendiums.

Science Is Everywhere: General Science | Series Nonfiction

An uptick in titles that integrate elements of pop culture with STEM subjects mark this latest batch of series nonfiction.

This article was published in School Library Journal's November 2016 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Bug Burgers to Black Holes: General Science | Series Nonfiction

Covering everything from toilets to the electromagnetic spectrum, these titles aim to inspire readers to look beyond seemingly ordinary occurrences and into the underlying scientific principles that define our lives.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2016 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Out-of-This-World Knowledge: General Science | Series Made Simple Spring 2013

Ever responsive to changing fads in educational theory, nonfiction publishers are, with varying success, already tweaking their new titles to conform to the Common Core science standards. These efforts range from inserting a few vague ideas for activities or demonstrations into otherwise conventional surveys of well-traveled informational territory to festooning texts with review questions, primary-source documents, photos and graphics, and suggestions for ongoing projects or lines of thought.

Endless Discoveries: General Science | Series Made Simple Fall 2012

In 1894, physicist Albert Michelson wrote:“The more important fundamental laws and facts of physical science have all been discovered, and these are now so firmly established that the possibility of their ever being supplemented in consequence of new discoveries is exceedingly remote.