May 26, 2017

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Gender Politics and Construction Equipment: The Eyelashening

File this one under the category: Stuff Parents Notice But Don’t Discuss You have a child.  The child is quite young, let’s say two years of age. The child loves books about tools, ladders, and banjos (and you would be shocked just how many books for kids contain at east one of those three items).  […]

Challenging Gender Norms with “Boys Read Pink” Celebration

The boys in Karen Yingling’s library balked at reading so-called “girl” books until she enlisted some eighth grade helpers who challenged gender assumptions during “Boys Read Pink” month.

Are we there yet?

I was asked to keynote for #njpaetec2 this past weekend. It’s not so unusual for me to speak at a local conference.  But conference organizer Barry Saide did not want me to talk about libraries or inquiry or social media curation or app smashing or the importance of online communities of practice. He wanted me […]

Thinking About Gender, Again

Gender is something that we typically think of in binary and often stereotypical terms. Most people continue to divide people up into either male or female and if we’re going to be honest, most of us have certain thoughts in our minds as to what it means to be female or male. We even have […]

Sunday Reflections: I’m Holding Out for a Hero, a Female Superhero

I have such conflicted feelings about this year’s superhero themed Summer Reading Club. As a big superhero fan myself, I was at first incredibly excited. But the truth is, for those of us raising daughters or working with the female gender – which coincidentally makes up half of the population – it’s a bit of […]

Sunday Reflections: I’m Holding Out for a Hero, a Female Superhero

I have such conflicted feelings about this year’s superhero themed Summer Reading Club. As a big superhero fan myself, I was at first incredibly excited. But the truth is, for those of us raising daughters or working with the female gender – which coincidentally makes up half of the population – it’s a bit of […]

Sunday Reflections: What I Learned While Trying to Put Together a Women’s History Display

I was walking by my YA room when I saw a staff member searching the shelves for something, so I went down and asked what she was looking for. It turned out, she was looking for inspiration for a new display. So after some talking we decided that we would do a Women’s History Month […]

When Boys Can’t Like ‘Girl Books’

Author Shannon Hale recently learned that some boys weren’t welcome at one of her school readings. It wasn’t the first time. Now the kid lit community is asking, are boys being discouraged from reading girl books?

Book review: Tomboy by Liz Prince

It’s not often that I find a book completely fantastic. It’s also not often that I find a character in YA and think, yes–finally! I was like that as a teen. I could have been that character. Or that character is someone I would actually have been friends with. Enter Liz Prince’s Tomboy, an utterly […]

Artistic Bonds, Gender-Bending Memoirs, and a New Look at Ernest Shackleton | Nonfiction Grades 5 and Up

Check out a gorgeous new volume on Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, two memoirs that tackle gender, and a graphic novel on Arctic explorer Ernest Shackleton.

This article was published in School Library Journal's August 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Confessions of a Cosplaying Librarian

“The key idea is actually a media literacy one related to representation: no one in real life actually looks like an anime or manga character.”

The Boy Problem: Many Boys Think School is Stupid and Reading Stinks

Is there a remedy?

Have you ever attended a Pentecostal service? I have… just once. I found it absolutely terrifying. People standing, waving their arms in the air, shouting unintelligible streams of words. I felt as though I had been locked in an asylum where I couldn’t understand the language the inmates were speaking.

Afterward, my friend Luis, who had invited me, asked me how I liked the service. “It was different,” I said, truthfully enough. “It’s not what I’m used to. […]