October 21, 2017

Subscribe to SLJ

The People’s Comics: Using the Graphic Format To Teach About Current Events

Graphic creators’ take on politics, from immigration to women’s rights.

This article was published in School Library Journal's August 2017 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Connecting with One Another: Social Science | Series Nonfiction

Are you students in need of a little global goodwill? Check out these latest series that promote social awareness and responsibility.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2017 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Nonfiction Xpress Reviews | April 2017

A biography of Japanese American civil rights activist Fred Korematsu; a delightful introduction to the Jewish holiday Purim starring a quirky chicken; and the true story of Kunkush the cat, who reunited with his Iraqi family after getting lost while fleeing the country.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2017 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

A Time To Act: John F. Kennedy’s Big Speech by Shana Corey | SLJ Review

COREY, Shana. A Time To Act: John F. Kennedy’s Big Speech. illus. by R. Gregory Christie. 48p. bibliog. further reading. notes. photos. NorthSouth. Apr. 2017. Tr $18.95. ISBN 9780735842755.

Gr 3-5 –On June 11, 1963, President John F. Kennedy gave an eloquent speech in which he made a plea for civil rights for African Americans. He was lauded for his blunt but sincere appeal to ensure equality for all Americans. Corey begins with biographical information on Kennedy, including his […]

DVD Review: Political Animals + Giveaway

When I’m reviewing books for professional publications, I stay quiet about them on social media. I’m always really excited once a review comes out to be able to talk about the book (or, in this case, DVD), finally! Here’s one of my most recent reviews, which originally appeared in the February 2017 issue of School Library Journal.   Political […]

Behind the Poster: Artist Calef Brown Talks with SLJ

SLJ chatted with the Lee Bennett Hopkins honor award winner about what led him to the creation of the striking poster included in our February 2017 issue.

Book Review: Racial Profiling: Everyday Inequality by Alison Marie Behnke

Publisher’s description In the United States, racial profiling affects thousands of Americans every day. Both individuals and institutions—such as law enforcement agencies, government bodies, and schools—routinely use race or ethnicity as grounds for suspecting someone of an offense. The high-profile deaths of unarmed people of color at the hands of police officers have brought renewed […]

Book Review: The March Against Fear: The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power by Ann Bausum

Publisher’s description James Meredith’s 1966 march in Mississippi began as one man’s peaceful protest for voter registration and became one of the South’s most important demonstrations of the civil rights movement. It brought together leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and Stokely Carmichael, who formed an unlikely alliance that resulted in the Black Power movement, […]

Nonfiction Round Up

OK, this was supposed to be a nonfiction roundup, and it sort of still is, because I am going to talk about a few titles. However it also sort of isn’t because I definitely have one title that I want to focus on. I’m also slightly skipping around in time (through the magic of this […]

Things I Never Learned in Library School: On Being a Teen Librarian 2 Weeks After the Election of Donald Trump

I knew eventually something like this would happen, I just didn’t think it would be so soon. The call came on Friday. A co-worker, her nephew took his own life. He was both black and gay and he saw the writing on the wall and he was scared. He read the news, he heard the […]

“March: Book Three” Takes 2016 National Book Award

“This is unreal!” shouted Congressman John Lewis, accepting the award for his graphic memoir of the civil rights movement.

“Selma”: Accurate Enough? Questions about the film’s historical accuracy present a teachable moment.

Weighing in on the recent controversy over “Selma” and the ensuing Oscar fallout, author Elizabeth Partridge offers some ideas for engaging students in a discussion about historical accuracy, primary sources, and expert opinion.

Free civil rights programs using presidential primary sources

Now through March, the Presidential Primary Sources Project (PPSP), a partnership involving the National Park Service, U.S. Presidential Libraries and Museums and other cultural and historic organizations, and the Internet2 community, offer an exciting series of free programs for students. Designed for grades 6 through 12, the programs created by ten historic sites and libraries, […]

Review: March, Book Two

Sometimes when I finish reading a book, it takes me a few minutes to pull out of the world I was engrossed in for hours. It’s because a book was so powerful that while I was entrenched in its pages, I only saw and heard what was in the book. Lately, books that evoke this […]

Teaching “Black Lives Matter” | SLJ Talks to Educator, Author Renée Watson

In the wake of a grand jury decision not to indict a New York police officer in the chokehold death of Eric Garner, an unarmed black man, educator Renée Watson offers advice on how teachers and students can broach recent events.

Social Justice Booktalks, a guest post by Cindy Shutts

Two weeks ago, when I was doing my bi-monthly booktalks for a sixth grade class, I was booktalking Because they Marched by Russell Freedman. This book focuses on the fact that it was nearly impossible to register to vote if you were black before the Voters Rights Act. One of the 6th graders asked me, […]

Symbols & Sites, Monuments & Movements: U.S. History | Series Made Simple Fall 2014

Backed by solid research and bolstered by top-notch writing, these books offer material on U.S. history, from the youngest readers to the oldest.

This article was published in School Library Journal's November 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Throwback Thursday: The Freedom Libraries of Mississippi

In this 50th anniversary year of Freedom Summer, a look back at SLJ’s 1965 coverage of efforts to provide library services for black children in one of the most segregationist states in the South.

The Big Screen’s ‘Dear White People’ and a Roundup of Not-to-Miss YA Novels

Dear White People, written and directed by Justin Simien, takes a satirical look at race relations in America. Be prepared for the October 17 premiere with a selection of books for teens that deal with intolerance, civil rights, and racism.

Understanding Ferguson: Resources on Protest, Nonviolent Resistance, and Civil Rights

Books and resources on the history of the Civil Rights movement, nonviolent resistance, the Rodney King legacy, the history of racial tensions between citizens and police, and more.