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April 15, 2014

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Daniel J. Siegel’s “Inside-Out” Guide to the Teenage Brain | Professional Shelf

Brainstorm

What if instead of viewing the teen years as a period in life that must be survived, we learn to embrace the potentially positive power of these formative years? In ‘Brainstorm,’ David J. Siegel, a neuropsychiatrist, offers a look at adolescent development and behavior informed by recent findings on how the brain works.

College Board Overhauls SAT Exams, Provides Support for Low-income Students

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The College Board announced sweeping changes to the SAT test that will align the exam more closely with what students learn in the classroom and more accurately reflect their future performance in college.

With “GeniusCon” Project, Students Connect and Problem Solve

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If you could change one thing about your school, what would it be, and how would you do it? Teacher librarians Sherry Gick and Matthew Winner are asking students this very question with a collaborative, student-driven initiative they’re calling GeniusCon.

’300: Rise of an Empire’ Reinterprets Ancient History with 21st-Century Flair | Media Mania

300: Epic Xerxes

Fans of 300, closely based on Frank Miller’s superb graphic novel, will be thrilled with the March 7 release of 300: Rise of an Empire (R), also inspired by a graphic novel by Miller (the not-yet published Xerxes). This time, the combat action moves to the high seas.

Women with a Story to Tell | JLG’s Booktalks to Go Teen

Pure Grit

World War II nurses went from gamboling on the beach to being prisoners in Philippine POW camps after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1940. Shyima Hall was sold into slavery by her own family, while Malala Yousafzai was shot because of speaking out for equal rights. Learn about these women with grit in this month’s selection of titles from the editors at Junior Library Guild.

Genre in the Common Core State Standards | On Common Core 2014

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Tuesday, April 1st, 2014, 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) place considerable emphasis on genre. In this presentation, Nell K. Duke, co-author of Reading and Writing Genre with Purpose in K to 8 Classrooms, will explain how the CCSS address genre in the reading and writing standards. She will share examples of projects that engage students in authentic reading and writing specific genres highlighted in the CCSS, and describe the ways in which school librarians can provide impetus and support for these kinds of projects.
Archive is now available!

“Sketchnotes” Invigorate Student Note-Taking and Bolster Visual Thinking

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Brad Ovenell-Carter, an education innovator at a K-12 school in Vancouver, B.C., is teaching students the value of sketchnotes—illustrated records that distill a lecture, speech, or lesson into a visual synopsis. Others educators are catching on.

The Good News | Consider the Source

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Lately, everything we hear about the Common Core State Standards is gloom and doom. Marc Aronson brings us the latest good news.

What’s Happening at the Core? | On Common Core 2014

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Thursday, March 20th, 2014, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET Four years after the first Common Core State Standards (CCSS) arrived in pilot states, educators are still grappling to understand them, assemble appropriate materials, and adjust curriculum and teaching methodologies. During this free webcast we will take a look at the current state of the Common Core, hear from experts in the field on issues surrounding implementation, and explore publishers’ responses to the CCSS. Archive is now available!

Text Sets: Blueprints for Curriculum Building | On Common Core 2014

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Tuesday, May 1st, 2014, 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET Educators have witnessed the power of children’s and young adult literature to engage students, inspire deep content exploration, differentiate instruction, and understand the potential of multimodal texts to transform classrooms. In this webcast, Mary Ann Cappiello and Erika Dawes, co-authors of Teaching with Text Sets, will take educators on a nuanced tour of the role of multimodal, multigenre text sets in the classroom. An overview of text sets and a discussion of the presenters’ process for creating them will offer attendees instructional models to serve as blueprints for curriculum building. Register Now!

On the Road with CCSS: Issues and Solutions to Implementation | On Common Core 2014

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Tuesday, May 8th, 2014, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET For the past year and a half, author and Rutgers University lecturer Marc Aronson, and Sue Bartle, the school library system director at New York’s Erie 2-Chautauqua-Cattaraugus BOCES, have been traversing the country presenting workshops on the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for teachers and librarians. In this session, they will report on what they have been seeing and hearing on their travels with a focus on the successes, both small and large, that educators have made in implementing the CCSS. They will provide listeners with a collection of ideas and resources to use in the classroom. Register Now!

Lolly’s Classroom Debuts on ‘Horn Book’ Site

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Lolly’s Classroom, The Horn Book’s newest blog, gives teachers some guidance and advice about using children’s and young adult literature in educational settings.

Tough Stuff: Books to Get Kids Talking About Life Issues| Focus On

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A compilation of recommended titles that work well as vehicles for book discussion. The books cover a variety of tough life issues and offer even reluctant readers a chance to discuss characters and their motivations, make connections to plot and setting, and craft some sophisticated arguments and analysis

This article was published in School Library Journal's February 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Teacher Development Grants from McCarthey Dressman Education Foundation

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If you’re a licensed K-12 teacher employed in a public or private school looking for a way to improve your classroom instruction (yes, libraries are classrooms!), consider applying for a development grant from the McCarthey Dressman Education Foundation.

Using Nonfiction in the Library, the Classroom and at Home

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Wednesday, February 26th, 2014, 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET/12:00 – 1:00 PM PT Join us for our Nonfiction Webcast to be sure you have the latest releases ready for your readers. Our featured panelists from Gale (part of Cengage Learning), Scholastic Library Publishing and ReferencePoint Press will discuss the trends in nonfiction, hot new releases, and upcoming titles. Archive is now available!

“Remember the Ladies” | Women Who Changed America

Founding Mothers

Are you ready for Women’s History Month? Share these handsomely illustrated and well-written, these captivating volumes to introduce individuals who stared down stereotypes, hurdled over social boundaries, and utilized their unique talents and abilities to follow their dreams.

Celebrations and Anniversaries | Nonfiction Notes, February, 2014

The Beatles

Topping the piles of books on our desks this month are volumes marking the 50th anniversary of the arrival of the Fab Four on American soil, titles to feature in your Black History Month displays, and a few choice selections on animals (and their plumage).

Through a Child’s Eyes | A Conversation with Marilyn Nelson

How I Discovered Poetry

In unrhymed sonnets, the acclaimed poet Marilyn Nelson traces her early years from age four to 14, describing her family’s many moves, her growing self-awareness, and her awakening as a poet.

No More “Yucky Spinach” | The Nonfiction of Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney

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“I am sick of nonfiction that is yucky spinach!” Andrea Davis Pinkney told her audience at the 2013 National Book Festival. Have no fear…she and Brian Pinkney serve up works as tasty as homemade pie.

Inquiry and Integration Across the Curriculum: Measurement

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Have you used a tape measure or a ruler lately? Figured out what coins to give a cashier? If you have, then you know how important measurement is in your daily life. This lesson plan provides a look at how children’s literature can support young children as they learn about standard measurement.