November 29, 2015

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A Curriculum Staple: Reading Aloud to Teens


Young people often listen at a higher comprehension level than they read, according to Jim Trelease, author of “The Read-Aloud Handbook.” Here are librarians’ suggestions for enhancing teen listening and literacy skills.

This article was published in School Library Journal's November 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Marilyn Nelson’s “My Seneca Village” | A Lesson Plan and Discussion Guide

my seneca village

In a series of stunning poems, Newbery and Coretta Scott King awards honoree Marilyn Nelson introduces readers to My Seneca Village, a multiethnic 19th-century community that thrived on the edge of what today is New York City’s Central Park

Ordinary Kids, Extraordinary Circumstances: World War II Fiction for Middle Grade Readers

into the killing seas

Set against a backdrop of dramatic world events, three engrossing and vividly written novels provide glimpses at history from the relatable perspectives of their young narrators.

“World Wildlife Fund Together” | Touch and Go

Screen from WWF Together

Children love photo-essays and stories about animals and educators looking to introduce global issues into the curriculum often find endangered animals a good place to start. The World Wildlife Fund provides a digital offering on the topic, with an update to their WWF Together app, available free on iOS, Android, and Kindle Fire.

Beyond the Headlines | New Books on Current Issues


Focusing on some of today’s hottest topics, these books provide critical updates and add context and depth to news stories on environmental and global issues.

I’m Your Neighbor | Books to Foster Understanding and Bridge Differences


I’m Your Neighbor (IYN), a project and website that promotes the use of children’s literature featuring “new arrival” cultures to engage communities “in a discussion of commonalities and differences.”

Exploring America’s Past: Historical Fiction for Middle Grade Readers


Three new superbly written books feature unique protagonists with compelling points of view and provide insight into the experiences of others, while underscoring the extraordinary courage of otherwise ordinary kids

Moderate Screen Time OK for Tots, AAP Now Says


The American Academy of Pediatrics’ updated recommendations on young children’s media use advise moderation.

Cooking Up Some Fun | Recipes for Young Chefs


As the holiday season approaches don’t forget to stock your shelves with a few cookbooks.

Reading is Fundamental Launches Read for Success


RIF is making Read for Success, a new program intervention, available to schools and community groups across America to help elementary school students excel at year-round reading.

A School-Wide Study of “Serial”


When a Massachusetts high school tapped the true-crime podcast for its summer “read,” students and teachers used writing, science, math, art, and dance to explore the case’s many questions.

This article was published in School Library Journal's November 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Where are the ELL Books? Educators need more content to serve growing demand


Technology may be transforming the way people learn a second language—but not in K–12 schools. Instead, librarians and teachers still prefer to use print books to support their English language learners (ELL), according to a survey by SLJ and Rourke Educational Media.

This article was published in School Library Journal's October 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

“iBiomes—Wetlands” | Touch and Go

Screen from iBiome ( )

A cheery professor guides students through “iBiome-Wetland,” an app designed to teach students about biodiversity through a series of gamelike activities featuring a fresh water marsh, a salt water marsh, and a mangrove swamp.

From Ziggurats to Skyscrapers | What We Build and How We Live

take shelter

This eye-opening selection of books about buildings and architecture provide a wealth of opportunities for exploring various cross-curricular topics including art, science, environmental studies, history, and cultural studies.

“One Teacher in 10 in the New Millennium: LGBT Educators Speak Out” | Professional Shelf

One teacher

“Today, in 2015, teachers can be fired in 29 states because of their sexual orientation and in 32 states because of their gender identity.”

A Librarian’s Guide to OER in the Maker Space


Open educational resources (OER) are a boon to maker activities, according to library media specialist Laura Fleming, who provides related tips and links to fun, cost-effective projects.

Meet “Homo naledi” | A Fascinating Discovery Surfaces

Marc 2

The discovery itself is only the beginning; the great news about this remarkable find is that it throws the science of human origins wide open.

All In A School Day | Picture-Book Perspectives

I'm new here

A selection of new picture books touch upon commonplace situations that are often part of the school experience, exhibiting sensitivity to their young protagonists’ perspectives.

Education, Justice Departments Release English Learner Tool Kit


Educators have a new, free resource to help them provide quality instruction to English learners. The English Learner (EL) Tool Kit was created by the U.S. Departments of Education (ED) and Justice to help states, districts and schools meet their legal obligations to serving ELs.

Barbara Carle, Cofounder of the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Has Died at 76

10th Anniversary (2)

Barbara Carle, an educator who served as the first board chair of the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, died on September 7 in North Carolina, following a brief illness. She was 76.