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April 24, 2015

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2015 Banned Books Week to Focus on YA Lit

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This year’s Banned Books Week (BBW, September 27 to October 3) will celebrate books written for the teen audience, the BBW National Committee announced on April 22.

What Does “Excellence” in Nonfiction Mean to YALSA? | Consider the Source

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A look at YALSA’s Nonfiction Award for Excellence leaves the author with some questions about the award’s criteria.

We Need More International Picture Books, Kid Lit Experts Say

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“Where the Wild Books Are,” an event organized by author/illustrator Etienne Delessert, celebrated international picture books and asked why some of these titles encounter resistance in the United States.

Library Police: Who Determines What Is “Appropriate”? | Scales on Censorship

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Pat Scales responds to a kindergarten educator who questions the age-appropriateness of This One Summer as a Caldecott Honor Book and an English teacher who grapples with what to do about her student teacher from a Christian university who has asked to opt out of working with To Kill a Mockingbird.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Capstone Announces New PebbleGo Dinosaurs

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At the Texas Library Association annual conference in Austin (April 14−17), Capstone unveils its pre-K−3 database PebbleGo Dinosaurs.

Pictures of the Week: Kwame Alexander Named Bank Street College of Education’s First Writer-in-Residence

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On April 6, 2015 Newbery Medalist Kwame Alexander was celebrated at Bank Street College of Education as the school’s first Writer-in-Residence for its Center for Children’s Literature.

Walking on Fear Street with R.L. Stine

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The king of juvenile horror is back with brand-new books in the “Fear Street” series. Get a sneak peek at the upcoming volumes in the popular series.

Pictures of the Week: Glen Ellyn (IL) Public Library’s BOB Celebration

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Thirteen-year-old Kiera Akines correctly selected the winners of eight matches in Glen Ellyn (IL) Public Library’s Mock Battle of the Kids’ Books event, including the winner, Steve Sheinkin’s Port Chicago 50.

Books I’d Like to See | Consider the Source

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Like me, you probably have a list of books that you would like to see written—and published. Here are a couple of topics I’d like to see addressed in a book. What are yours?

First Book and Unbound Concepts Partner to Match Low-Income Readers with Books

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First Book, a nonprofit that provides books to low-income schools and programs for a steep discount, has partnered with Unbound Concepts, a reading-focused tech company, to announce an app Artifact, matching books with low-income readers.

“Port Chicago 50″ Wins Seventh Annual Battle of the Kids’ Books

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In BOB’s final round, The Closer, Newbery Medalist Clare Vanderpool, selects Steve Sheinkin’s Port Chicago 50 as the victor of the yearly virtual tournament of books for children and teens.

Bedtime Bunnies, Western Railroad Waitresses, and Typhoid Mary Populate Boyds Mills | 2015 Spring Preview

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At the Spring Preview for Boyds Mills, a full range of nonfiction and fiction alike presided, including a story about restless bunnies in Bedtime at Bessie and Lil’s, a young boy who is a space explorer in Space Boy and His Dog, and an exploration of Typhoid Mary who spread the disease to many in Fatal Fever: Tracking Down Typhoid Mary.

Disney Hyperion Editors Take Dramatic Turn | 2015 Spring Preview

Editor Laura Schreiber reads Tim Federle's 'Tommy Can't Stop.'

At the Disney Hyperion 2015 Spring Preview, editors traded in the red pencils for scripts as they did dramatic readings from their upcoming titles from Christopher Myers, Tim Federle, Dave Barry, and Bob Shea.

Review: Stratford Zoo Midnight Revue Presents: Macbeth

Review: Stratford Zoo Midnight Revue Presents: Macbeth

The Stratford Zoo is like any other zoo…until closing time! That’s when the animals come out of their cages to perform Shakespeare’s greatest works. They might not be the best actors, but they’ve got heart. (Also fangs, feathers, scales, and tails.) Review: Stratford Zoo Midnight Revue Presents: Macbeth Written by Ian Lendler; Art by Zack Giallongo All […]

Graphic Novels, Diversity Dominate in SLJ’s 2015 Battle of the Kids’ Books First Round

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The opening round of the annual virtual tournament featuring children’s and young adult books in a March Madness—like competition has come to a close. Graphic novels This One Summer and El Deafo and celebrated titles Brown Girl Dreaming and Port Chicago 50, among others, have continued on to fight another day.

The New Immigrants NYC 1880-1924 | Touch and Go

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In its breath and depth, a new app created by the New York City Department of Education in partnership with four cultural institutions will help students understand the value of primary sources, develop insight into the experience of millions of new arrivals to our nation in the early 20th century, and explore historical thinking. And best of all—it’s free.

SLJ’s Average Book Prices for 2015

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Check out average book prices for children’s, young adult, and adult titles in hardcover, trade paperback, and mass-market paperback format.

SLJ’s Battle of the Kids’ Books

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School Library Journal’s Battle of the Kids’ Books is a competition among 16 of the very best books for young people of the year, judged by some of the biggest names in children’s books.

Should Online Book Reviews Be Anonymous? | Up for Debate

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SLJ presents the latest Up for Debate regarding young adult author Kathleen Hale’s tale of her response to being catfished by a reviewer, which ran in The Guardian last October. What role can anonymity play in book criticism? Is it invaluable or irresponsible? A critic and an author respond.

Spring Giveaways from Merit Press and Chronicle; International Reading Association Renamed | SLJTeen News

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For millennials, being able to read is just the start of developing literacy skills; in recognition, the International Reading Association has renamed itself the International Literacy Association. Spring giveaways include creepily serious A Work of Art and the ridiculously useful Funny on Purpose.