April 26, 2017

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Roger Sutton

About Roger Sutton

Need a job?

With the lovely Siân Gaetano departing the Horn Book to become the children’s/YA editor of Shelf Awareness, we have an opening for an editorial assistant. See below. Position:            Editorial Assistant Reports To:       Managing Editor, Horn Book Guide Location:           Boston The Horn Book Guide provides comprehensive coverage of […]

Please come to Boston in the fall

If you are at TLA, stop by the Horn Book booth and promise us your unborn children give us your email address to enter a pretty fabulous raffle we have going for attendees. The winner will get airfare, two nights hotel, and free admission to the Boston Globe Horn Book Awards ceremony and Horn Book […]

Quitcher bitchin

Last week, I had a complaint from a librarian about a Magazine review in which we called a character “fucking adorable.” Although I’m enjoying the thought of editing a magazine in which such sentiments might be expressed, we of course had called a character  no such thing–it was a quote from the book under review, and […]

Ever just the same

“Roger, didn’t you know that everything goes back to ‘Beauty and the Beast?’” That was Deborah Stevenson talking to me sotto voce in 1989 or so after listening to our boss Betsy Hearne make yet another connection between some new book or other and the classic French tale to which she had given her scholarly […]

Starred reviews, May/June 2017 Horn Book Magazine

  The following books will receive starred reviews in the upcoming issue of The Horn Book Magazine. (It’s our annual special issue; this time on the topic of humor. LAUGH, dammit.) The Rooster Who Would Not Be Quiet; by Carmen Agra Deedy; illustrated by Eugene Yelchin (Scholastic) Bob, Not Bob!; by Liz Garton Scanlon and […]

Some writer, artist, friend!

I hope you’ll join me for the 2017 Zena Sutherland Lecture, to be held on Friday, May 5 at 7:30PM at the Harold Washington Library Center in Chicago. Our lecturer is the wonderful Melissa Sweet; her chosen topic is “To Inform and Delight: The Elements of Story.” Tickets are free but you gotta reserve your […]

Diversity by the numbers

Please read Martha’s interview with K.T. Horning about the CCBC‘s fabled accounting of diversity in children’s books. I wonder what those numbers would look like from here, that is, if you counted the same variables for those books reviewed by the Horn Book Guide, would you get the same kind of numbers? I don’t think […]

What I read on my summer vacation

I’m back from a blessed week away in Palm Springs where we saw lots of sun, tennis, and friends and family. The Men’s Final was especially nice for me, as to hear a crowd of thousands shouting “Go, Roger!” is indeed a tonic. My reading shuttled between two books. I’m almost done with and completely […]

To the battlements!

Baby sis has begun her annual Battle of the Books, with Duncan Tonatiuh comparing the merits of Freedom in Congo Square and Freedom Over Me.
Also, the Horn Book Podcast is back up and running. Last week Sian talked to author and agent Rebecca Podos and…

At the bottom of my garden

Oh, I owe some of you fantasy writers an apology. Over on Twitter, I’ve been pretty hard on your  Capital Letters and apostrophes and archaisms and spelling. Mostly spelling, like “magick,” or, gilding the lily, “enmagick.” And then there’s faery. That’s a spelling that has been the fingernails on my personal chalkboard ever since chalkboards were […]

That’s a lot of men!

Actually, it’s not so much that there are a @ALotofMen in the latest newspaper misrepresentation of the children’s book biz; the problem is that there are so few. I am not suggesting the article needed More Men, simply that it seems to lack any understanding of how librarians purchase books for library collections. Sure, the road […]

The horror! The horror!

So I’m reading World War Z for my part in Gene Luen Yang’s Reading Without Walls challenge. I admit I’m only biting off a little piece at a time, but I would have devoured the thing whole in high school, where most of my reading was either fantasy or horror or Ayn Rand, but I see […]

Free trade agreement

Oh, Susan Hill. The Brits haven’t given me this much material since Lynne Reid Banks complained of lesbian love in a David Almond novel. A bookstore choosing not to stock a book is not censoring it. A bookstore taking a political point of view is not censorship. A bookstore saying to a customer, “no, we don’t […]

Fantasizing?

Then join Children’s Books Boston on February 23rd as Our Martha leads a conversation with Kristin Cashore and Tui Sutherland about just what’s going on in those big books today. Maybe they will talk about The Naming. Info at this link.

March/April starred reviews, Horn Book Magazine

The following books will receive starred reviews in the March/April issue of The Horn Book Magazine: Big Cat, Little Cat; written and illustrated by Elisha Cooper (Roaring Brook). Short Stories for Little Monsters; written and illustrated by Marie-Louise Gay (Groundwood). When We Were Alone; by David A. Robertson; illus. by Julie Flett (Highwater Press). The […]

A word from Bertha

“In times like these Resistance means remembering every day the widespread suffering of innocent men, women, and children near and far, and helping now. It means bearing in daily remembrance all those who have recently laid down their lives in hope. It means a new sense of world brotherhood—and the will to express it. In […]

Just in time for Presidents’ Day!

I was wondering over on Facebook last week about what a series biography of our 45th president might look like, and my prayers have been answered. AS IF. But there is a new biography of Trump and I thought you all would want to know about it. Written by Diane Marczely Gimpel and published by […]

Winning!

If John Lewis (pictured above at the march in Atlanta on Saturday) hasn’t made enough history, he is also the first person to win four awards in one day from the ALA: Lewis’s book March: Book Three, written with Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell, this morning won the Coretta Scott King Award, the Sibert Award, the […]

The Horn Book Goes South

Martha Parravano, Al Berman, and I will be at ALA Midwinter in Atlanta this weekend. While Martha is busy on the CSK Award committee and rounding up articles and new contributors, Al and I will be stalking the exhibit hall to see what’s new and get publishers to transfer funds from their advertising budgets into […]

Vote!

Calling Caldecott has opened its first ballot for voting so get over there and choose your top three. My first choice was Ashley Bryan’s Freedom over Over Me–I remember when Betsy Hearne took heat at BCCB for suggesting in an editorial that Brock Cole’s Celine was worthy of the Medal, and an SLJ editor chastised her […]