June 27, 2016

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Pat Scales

About Pat Scales

Pat Scales is the former chair of the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee. You can send your questions or comments on censorship to her at pscales@bellsouth.net.

Courting Controversy? | Scales on Censorship

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Assigning a recently challenged book; teachers’ political views; classroom book selection policies.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2016 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Assessing Controversial Books | Scales on Censorship

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Should libraries that already purchased books based on their starred reviews keep or withdraw them because of subsequent controversies?

This article was published in School Library Journal's February 2016 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Fresh Alternatives Build Engagement | Scales on Censorship

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Censorship expert Pat Scales offers guidance on helping competitive readers find their own thing, balancing the responsibility to protect privacy, and orienting new teachers to the role of the library.

This article was published in School Library Journal's December 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Open Door Policy for All Students | Scales on Censorship

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The importance of providing student access to the library.

This article was published in School Library Journal's October 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

It’s About Choice: Tactics for Fostering Intellectual Freedom | Scales on Censorship

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Censorship expert Pat Scales tackles the trouble with trigger warnings, the finesse of Banned Books Week planning, and the problem with narrowing options for reading.

This article was published in School Library Journal's August 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

When Colleagues Need Clarification About Restricting Books | Scales on Censorship

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Don’t be afraid to enter the discussion about intellectual freedom, and be firm when stating your opinion.

This article was published in School Library Journal's June 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Library Police: Who Determines What Is “Appropriate”? | Scales on Censorship

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Pat Scales responds to a kindergarten educator who questions the age-appropriateness of This One Summer as a Caldecott Honor Book and an English teacher who grapples with what to do about her student teacher from a Christian university who has asked to opt out of working with To Kill a Mockingbird.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Value Judgment | Scales On Censorship

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This month, Pat Scales fires back on a principal who nixes the study of a novel with a Buddhist mother-character in a world religions program, a teacher who wants to label library books by reading-level, and a company contracted for book fairs that labels a graphic novel featuring a kiss between two boys as “Mature Content.”

This article was published in School Library Journal's February 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Should ‘Girl’ Books Be Labeled? | Scales on Censorship

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A public librarian asks if merging her teen and adult collection will reduce the challenges to the YA literature collection; a school librarian writes about the superintendent’s restriction on teaching some of the classics listed on the Facts on Fiction website. SLJ censorship columnist, Pat Scales, provides answers to these matters and more.

This article was published in School Library Journal's September 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Keeping Kids’ Library Records Private| Scales on Censorship

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SLJ columnist Pat Scales addresses the privacy of kids’ library records; censoring incarcerated teen reading; and the difference between “restricting” and “removing.”

This article was published in School Library Journal's June 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

SLJ Columnist Pat Scales Addresses Censorship Concerns in Libraries

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Librarian and SLJ columnist Pat Scales responds to a range of censorship issues from librarians around the country.

This article was published in School Library Journal's April 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Challenge-Ready: Using Thoughtful Leadership to Promote the Freedom to Read | Scales on Censorship

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Chair of the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee Pat Scales offers advice and resources to educators looking to promote the freedom to read in their classrooms and libraries.

This article was published in School Library Journal's February 2014 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Foster Stronger Schools by Supporting Reading Freedom | Scales on Censorship

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Chair of the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee Pat Scales responds to questions about book challenges, dystopian novels in elementary school, and the age-appropriateness of Bullying Prevention displays.

This article was published in School Library Journal's November 2013 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Give Children a Choice: Advocating Open Access to Materials | Scales on Censorship

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Chair of the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee Pat Scales responds to questions about book challenges, summer reading lists, and boundaries for school library parent volunteers.

This article was published in School Library Journal's September 2013 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

A Formal Challenge Process Provides Teaching Moments | Scales on Censorship

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Chair of the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee Pat Scales tackles censorship questions about The Hunger Games, grammar in “Junie B. Jones” series, and why reporting materials challenges to the ALA OIF is so important.

Childproofed: When Your School Has Inflexible Filters | Scales on Censorship

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Pat Scales, chair of the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee, answers readers’ questions about censorship. This month, Scales addresses what to do when your school has inflexible or strict Internet filters, including strategies for aiding students in completing research assignments and advice on instituting new policies for challenged materials.

Oh, Mama!: What to do when a parent wants to narrow her child’s reading choices | Scales on Censorship January 2013

As I was preparing a library card for a new student, she handed me a two-page list of books that her mother won’t allow her to read. Then later on, her mother called and told me she expected me to monitor what her daughter was reading. What should I do?

You need to tell the mother that it’s not your role to monitor students’ reading. If she has an issue with the titles that her daughter chooses, then she […]

Mum’s the Word: What to do when a pushy principal has questionable principles | Scales on Censorship

In addition to reading your column, what’s the best way to keep up with news about censorship?

Start by checking out the American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom (www.ala.org/offices/oif), which maintains a database of challenges to library materials. These challenges are reported in its Intellectual Freedom Newsletter ($50 a year), unless the person reporting the challenge asks ALA to keep the information confidential. Another helpful resource is Robert P. Doyle’s Banned Books: Challenging Our Freedom to Read […]

What To Do When Kids Aren’t Allowed To Read Digital Books in School | Scales on Censorship

Parents who visit our library’s children’s room have told me that ereaders have encouraged their kids to read. My son is a struggling reader, and he was very excited when I bought him one. But then we found out that his reading teacher won’t allow her students to read ebooks—they can only read books from the school library. How do I handle this?

How Low Can You Go?: What to do when young students want to read ‘The Hunger Games’ | Scales on Censorship

Our fourth and fifth graders (and a few third graders) have been asking for The Hunger Games. I love the novel, but it’s not in our elementary school’s library collection because it’s a YA book. I think my students would enjoy reading it when they’re a bit older. I need your advice.