March 27, 2017

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Jennifer Wharton is the youth services librarian at the Matheson Memorial Library in Elkhorn, Wisconsin. You can follow more of her library adventures at jeanlittlelibrary.blogspot.com.

Jennifer Wharton

About Jennifer Wharton

Jennifer Wharton is the youth services librarian at the Matheson Memorial Library in Elkhorn, Wisconsin. You can follow more of her library adventures at jeanlittlelibrary.blogspot.com.

Comical Information | Nonfiction Notions

000 Volcano

Can the graphic novel format ever be considered “true” nonfiction? For librarian Jennifer Wharton, who recommended several recent favorites, they occupy a space between fiction and nonfiction, offering readers a highly accessible and exciting entry into informational text.

Series for Every Type of Reluctant Reader | Nonfiction Notions

Blast Back

Librarian Jennifer Wharton explains the three major reluctant reader types and recommends high-interest titles for each.

Giving the Gift of Nonfiction | Nonfiction Notions

who-wins

When thinking about holiday gift-giving this season, don’t forget about nonfiction!

Excellent Narrative Nonfiction Mentor Texts | Nonfiction Notions

nf-notionsmentor-tn

Narrative nonfiction offers opportunities to teach students how to structure a research project, pose questions, investigate sources, and draw conclusions. These five titles are ideal mentor texts for use in classrooms and curricula.

Deliberate Research and Inclusive History: A Chat with Sarah Albee | Nonfiction Matters

Sarah Albee

Sarah Albee is passionate about the research process—be it about famous historical figures, insects, or the evolution of the toilet.

Integrating Nonfiction into Your Summer Booktalking | Nonfiction Notions

BT160518_nonfic

Nonfiction Notions columnist Jennifer Wharton recommends several recent nonfiction titles and offers simple ways to include them in summer reading booktalking.

Read It, Make It: Low-Tech Maker Projects and Titles | Nonfiction Notions

BT160316_recycle

Librarian Jennifer Wharton recommends several cheap, easy, and low-tech maker activities paired with books that offer step-by-step instruction.