December 11, 2017

The Advocate's Toolbox

10 Crafty and Bookish Holiday Displays

‘Tis the season…for seasonal displays! Take inspiration from these 10 library creations.

ABOVE: The Delaware County (OH) Library District Library created this fun, festive book tree out of red and green books from their Friends of the Library book sale collection. They built the tree by stacking books of comparable size in a circle until a tree shape was formed. They topped the tree with a holiday book and wrapped the books in strands of holiday lights. Follow their Flickr account.

LEFT: Courtney Lewis and her students from Wyoming Seminary in Kingston, PA, created this elaborate fireplace out of bound periodicals and Reader’s Guides. The mantle is made of foam wrapped in red felt, while books wrapped in brown paper and paper flames decorate the hearth. Finishing touch: a big red bow and a beautiful menorah prominently displayed in the center. Read more about the display on her blog.

BELOW LEFT: Sonja Schulz and her student assistants from Nacogdoches (TX) High School created this clever snowman on their reference wall by facing books pages-side-out. They made the hat from black books and crafted buttons, arms, and a face out of paper. A tulle scarf completes Frosty’s look. Follow Schultz on Twitter.

BELOW RIGHT: Kerry Ann Morgan from the North Orange Branch Library in Apopka, FL ,made this adorable snowman by wrapping hardbound and paperback books along with VHS tapes in white, recycled flyers and copy paper. She added buttons, stick arms, a scarf, and made a hat from foam sheets found in the craft supplies room.  Follow Morgan on Twitter.

BELOW: My library at North Buncombe High School in Weaverville, NC, makes these Christmas trees by folding magazines. Just take the corner of the page, fold it to the center, and fold a second time if you want to make a skinnier triangle; fold up the bottom and you are done. Repeat with each page until the entire magazine is transformed into triangles. Glue two magazines back to back to make a fuller tree. For shorter trees, use a small magazine like Readers Digest. Decorating with buttons, ribbons, and bows; spray paint optional.

RIGHT:   Stephanie Bowers-Buckridge from the Dinuba (CA) Branch Library created this reindeer and snowman by stacking white and brown books. With construction paper, cardboard, felt, and googly eyes, she created this charming display. See more on the Dinuba Branch Facebook page.

BELOW LEFT AND RIGHT: Staff at the McAllen (TX) Public Library decorated the end caps of their shelves to look like presents, snowmen, penguins, and polar bears (not pictured). For the presents, they wrapped the caps in wrapping paper and decorated with ribbon and bows. The snowman and penguin were made out of butcher paper, and the faces and featured cut out freehand by an assistant. Check out the library Flickr.

BELOW LEFT: Kathy Ransom, artist and owner of the popular website ADelightsomeLife, shares this beautiful book wreath tutorial that can add whimsy to any library display. Check out the book wreath tutorial, along with a book garland tutorial.

BELOW RIGHT: Kerri Smith from Washington High School Library in Sioux Falls, SD, made this classic holly wreath sign out of red and green paper. She and students cut and bent the paper leaves to give it a more realistic look and added red paper berries. Find more of their library displays on their website.



Katie Darty is a librarian at North Buscombe High School in Weaverville, NC. 

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Comments

  1. Frances Wildsmith says:

    What great holiday ideas! So clever!!

  2. Hi

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