Google+

August 28, 2014

Subscribe to SLJ

Leverage ‘Information Gaps’ to Spark Student Curiosity | The Science of Interest

Interest is the engine of intellectual achievement—it’s what drives us to keep learning, keep trying, keep pushing forward. But how does one generate interest and curiosity, in oneself or others? In the keynote I gave at the recent School Library Journal Leadership Summit, I offered some ideas; you’ll be able to read more about them in the November issue of SLJ.

10005436585 a76a447677 Leverage Information Gaps to Spark Student Curiosity | The Science of Interest

Annie Murphy Paul speaking at SLJ’s Leadership Summit in Austin, TX, September 28, 2013.

In the meantime, I’d like to share with you some other answers to that question. They’re inspired by a classic paper, “The Psychology of Curiosity,” written by George Loewenstein, a professor of economics and psychology at Carnegie Mellon University.

Curiosity arises, Loewenstein wrote, “when attention becomes focused on a gap in one’s knowledge. Such information gaps produce the feeling of deprivation labeled curiosity. The curious individual is motivated to obtain the missing information to reduce or eliminate the feeling of deprivation.” Loewenstein’s theory helps explain why curiosity is such a potent motivator: it’s not only a mental state but also an emotion, a powerful feeling that impels us forward until we find the information that will fill in the gap in our knowledge.

Here, three practical ways to use information gaps to stimulate curiosity:

1. Start with the question. Cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham notes that teachers — along with parents, managers, and leaders of all kinds — are often “so eager to get to the answer that we do not devote sufficient time to developing the question,” Willingham writes in his book, Why Don’t Students Like School? Yet it’s the question that stimulates curiosity; being told an answer quells curiosity before it can even get going. Instead of starting with the answer, begin by posing for yourself and others a genuinely interesting question — one that opens an information gap.

2. Prime the pump. In his 1994 paper, George Loewenstein noted that curiosity requires some initial knowledge. We’re not curious about something we know absolutely nothing about. But as soon as we know even a little bit, our curiosity is piqued and we want to learn more. In fact, research shows that curiosity increases with knowledge: the more we know, the more we want to know. To get this process started, Loewenstein suggests, “prime the pump” with some intriguing but incomplete information.

3. Bring in communication. Language teachers have long put a similar idea to use in exercises that open an information gap and then require learners to communicate with each other in order to fill it. For example, one student might be given a series of pictures illustrating the beginning of the story, while the student’s partner is given a series of pictures showing how that same story ends. Only by speaking with each other (in the foreign language they are learning, of course) can the students fill in each others’ information gaps.

This technique can be adapted in all kinds of ways by librarians. For example, students from different grades could be asked to complete a task together, one that requires the identification of information gaps that older and younger classmates must fill in for each other. That way, every student holds a piece of the bigger puzzle—stimulating pride in their own contributions, and curiosity about others’.

Journalist and author Annie Murphy Paul has written the upcoming book Brilliant: The New Science of Smart (Crown, 2014).

Share
Comment Policy:
  1. Be respectful, and do not attack the author or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  2. Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  3. Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.

We are not able to monitor every comment that comes through (though some comments with links to multiple URLs are held for spam-check moderation by the system). If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.

We accept clean XHTML in comments, but don't overdo it and please limit the number of links submitted in your comment. For more info, see the full Terms of Use.

Speak Your Mind

*